Africa | Land Portal

Africa is the world's second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. At about 30.2 million km² (11.7 million sq mi) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of the Earth's total surface area and 20.4% of the total land area.[2] With 1.0 billion people (as of 2009, see table) in 61 territories, it accounts for about 14.72% of the world's human population.

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State of Land Information Consultancy
6 December 2022
Africa
Sudan
Mozambique
Zimbabwe
Gambia
Ghana
Liberia
Sierra Leone

The Land Portal is hiring researchers with expertise on Liberia, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, Sudan, Mozambique, Ghana,  and The Gambia.

EU Land Governance Capitalization Meeting
20 October 2021
Africa
Sudan
Burundi
Ethiopia
Kenya
Malawi
Uganda
Angola
Cameroon
Eswatini
Ghana
Guinea-Bissau
Côte d'Ivoire
Niger

With a total of 65 participants (37% women) from 14 countries (Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Kenya, Malawi, Niger, Pakistan, Sudan and Uganda) the 10th and last Capitalization Meeting of the EU Land Governance Transversal Project, was virtually delivered due to COVID-19.

Pan-African Conference on Community Land Rights identifies urgent collective land rights reforms and women’s rights as critical for securing social peace in Africa
15 October 2021
Africa
Madagascar

Delegates from 12 countries united in Lomé, Togo for the 3rd Conference by the African Land Institutions Network for Community Rights (ALIN); They highlighted successes and challenges from ongoing community land rights reforms in their countries, and charted a roadmap for the future; The conference, hosted by the Government of Togo, was initiated by the Rights and Resourc

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Objectif du projet  : L’objectif de développement (ODP) est «d'améliorer l’accès à des moyens et services de production essentiels et aux marchés pour les pasteurs et agropasteurs dans des zones transfrontalières sélectionnées et le long des axes de transhumance dans les six pays du Sahel, et d’améliorer la capacité de ces pays à répondre à temps et de façon efficace en cas de crises pastorales ou d’urgences ».

Make Every Woman Count (MEWC) is an African woman-led organisation which serves as a mobilizing, networking, information, advocacy and training platform for African women by building their leadership capacities to influence policy and decision making.

The Sam Moyo African Institute for Agrarian Studies was established as an independent Trust in 2002 to fulfil a need that had been observed through research, for a policy institute focused on addressing Africa's land and agrarian questions. The AIAS interacts with various organisations and countries to assist them in developing capacity for policy formulation and research. It also facilitates policy dialogue among governments, academics, civil society and others on land and agrarian development, especially the land rights of marginalised social groups.

 

MIFUMI is an international non-government women’s rights organisation based in Uganda. MIFUMI’s work revolves around protection of women and children experiencing violence and other forms of abuse. MIFUMI believes that if women are empowered they can rise above many of the cultural traditions that hold them back,such as Bride Price. If women are to realise their full potential, they can become the greatest contributors to development.

PhD Student, University of Edinburgh School of Geosciences

Economic valuation of ecosystem services for improved land governance and livelihoods: case study in large scale land acquisitions in Zambia

Women's Land Link Africa (WLLA) is a joint regional partnership project that was launched in 2004. The WLLA was founded on the principal that all who are truly dedicated to improving the situation for women's land and housing rights (and to doing so in a manner which is both sustainable and stakeholder-driven) can and must link in complementary ways. The WLLA supports and strengthens linkages between regional stakeholders focused on improving women's access to, control over and ownership of land and housing in Africa. Working in isolation has rarely improved situations.

Poverty is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa, with more than 40% of the population living below the poverty line, surviving on incomes of less than $1.90 a day.

That’s where Farm Africa comes in. 

Africa possesses 60% of the world's uncultivated land suitable for crop production and has huge capacity for development. Farm Africa believes that Africa has the power to feed itself.

Farm Africa helps farmers grow more, sell more and sell for more. We pioneer techniques that boost harvests, build rural incomes, sustain natural resources and help end Africa’s need for aid.

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Mokoro is pleased to host the ’Land Rights in Africa’ site as a contribution to the land rights dialogue and related debates. This website was created in January 2000 by Robin Palmer, and was originally housed by Oxfam GB, where Robin worked as a Land Rights Adviser. A library of resources on land rights in Africa – with a particular focus on women’s land rights and on the impact of land grabbing in Africa – the portal has been well received by practitioners, researchers and policy makers, and has grown considerably over the years.

African Development Fund logo

The African Development Fund (ADF) is the concessional window of the African Development Bank (AfDB) Group. Established in 1972, it became operational in 1974. Administered by the African Development Bank, it comprises, to date, 32 contributing countries and benefits 38 countries. The 38 ADF-eligible countries include those that are increasing their economic capacities and heading toward becoming the new emerging markets—as well as those that remain fragile and need special assistance for basic levels of service delivery.

African Cities Journal aspires to gather existing and future knowledge in the field of urban spaces in Africa through original research articles, as well as more prospective endeavours of theory and methodology. 

The WAD (Women's Action for Development) project focused on improving the socio-economic situation of vulnerable, rural women in the Kunene, Kavango and Oshikoto regions of Namibia. The objective of the project was to contribute towards poverty alleviation and to empower young, marginalised Namibian women. This was achieved by enhancing the income generating capacities of 2819 San and Ovahimba women. Interventions included training on social issues and women’s rights, vocational skills training in a myriad of vocations varying from computer skills to welding.

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