Cambodia related Blog post | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
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15 March 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Chanthearyradh Thao
Cambodia

Cambodia​ aims​ to​ fasten​ its​ economic​ growth​ while​ fully​ committing​ to​ sustainable​ development.​ To​ avoid​ adverse​ impacts​ from​ the​ development​ and​ promote​ long​ term​ benefits​ to​ economic,​ social​ and​ environmental​ change,​ the​ practice​ of​ Environmental​ Impact​ Assessment​ (EIA)​ shall​ be​ enforced.​ And​ since​ EIA​ has​ become​ an​ essential​ feature​ of​ sustainable​ development​ for​ improving​ well-being​ and​ equity​ from​ the​ development,​ the​ public​ must​ fully​ participate​ in​ policy​ debates​ and​ seek​ legal​ redress​ and​ claim​ what​ they​ dese

This map draws on Chinese infrastructure project location data from AidData and forest cover loss data from Hansen et al. (2013).
Cambodia
China
Tanzania

Conservationists and environmental advocacy groups have warned that the nature, pace and scale of Chinese-funded infrastructure projects in the developing world may lead to unintended environmental consequences, especially in so-called “ecological hotspots.” Until now, there has been no systematic, large-scale evidence that confronts the causal claim that Chinese-funded development projects have

Cambodia

On 15th September the International Criminal Court broadened its process for selecting and prioritising cases to include land grabbing and environmental destruction. The decision presents an opportunity to curb the deforestation and rights abuses driven by illegally-issued agricultural concessions in Cambodia, likely to be the court’s first credible case. It also has important implications for other countries suffering from the worst excesses of illegal deforestation. Neil Loughlin and Tom Johnson report.

Part of the IRRI Collection / Flickr
South-Eastern Asia
Cambodia
Laos
Myanmar
Thailand
Vietnam

This blog was written as a contribution to the Mekong Regional Land Forum taking place from June 21-23 in Hanoi, Vietnam. Philip Hirsch is a keynote speaker at this event.

By Philip Hirsch, Professor of Human Geography in the School of Geosciences at the University of Sydney

26 May 2019
Authors: 
Katie Reytar
Angola
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Uruguay
United States of America
Cambodia
India
Ireland

By Katie Reytar 

This is the second installment of WRI’s blog series, New Perspectives on Restoration. The series aims to share WRI’s views on restoration, dispel myths, and explore restoration opportunities throughout the world.

3 May 2019
South-Eastern Asia
Cambodia

By Chris Hufstader

 

After an audacious land grab by a foreign company, indigenous women in a remote Cambodian village struggle to regain their farms and sacred sites.

Sol Preng remembers vividly the day in 2012 when bulldozers unexpectedly arrived on her family farm.

“The company came and cleared away our cashew trees right before the harvest,” she says. “I lost four hectares of land and all my cashew trees.”

Authors: 
Megan MacInnes
Cambodia

At last month’s International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC) in Malaysia, I co-hosted a panel on land grabbing and corruption with Transparency International. This global annual event gathers together governments, civil society, enforcement agencies, journalists and others to discuss ways of tackling corruption. This year’s IACC focused on ending impunity – a problem which has helped make land grabbing prolific and very hard to tackle.

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