Urbanization Imprint on Soil Bacterial Communities in Forests and Grasslands | Land Portal

Informations sur la ressource

Date of publication: 
janvier 2023
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
LP-midp003442
Copyright details: 
© 2023 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article

Urbanization alters land uses and creates heterogeneous environmental conditions in cities and their surroundings, which may directly or indirectly impact soil microorganisms. However, how urbanization affects soil bacterial diversity and community composition, particularly in different land use types, remains largely unknown. In this study, we collected 36 soil samples (18 forest and 18 grass soils) along a rural-suburban-urban gradient in Chang-Zhu-Tan agglomeration. The bacterial diversity and community composition were investigated using 16S rRNA gene sequencing that targeted the V3-V4 region. Our results showed that urbanization induced shifts in bacterial diversity and community composition in both forestlands and grasslands. Specifically, soil bacterial diversity was higher in urban areas than in their suburban and rural counterparts in forests and grasslands, particularly in forests, where significant increases were detected. Urbanization changed the most dominated soil bacterial community from Acidobacteria to Proteobacteria in forestland. Significant decrease and increase were observed in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria (e.g., Acidobacteriales, Acidobacteriia_Subgroup2 and Solibacterales) and Proteobacteria (e.g., Betaproteobacteriales, Myxococcales and Sphingomonadales), respectively, in the forests with increasing urbanization intensity. In contrast, Proteobacteria always dominated the soil bacterial community along the rural-suburban-urban gradient in grassland, and significant decrease and increase in Nitrospirae and Latescibacteria were induced by urbanization, respectively. In addition to urbanization and total nitrogen, total organic carbon and ratio of carbon and nitrogen were the main factors that related with the bacterial community in forest soils, whereas soil water content was the main factor related with soil bacterial community in the grasslands. Together, our results indicate that the urbanization results in shifts in bacterial community composition and diversity, but the extent varied between forest and grassland, which may due to different human management intensity.

Auteurs et éditeurs

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

Gao, DandanZhang, NingLiu, ShuguangNing, ChenWang, XinyueFeng, Shuailong

Corporate Author(s): 

Forests (ISSN 1999-4907) is an international and cross-disciplinary scholarly journal of forestry and forest ecology. It publishes research papers, short communications and review papers. There is no restriction on the length of the papers. Our aim is to encourage scientists to publish their experimental and theoretical research in as much detail as possible. Full experimental and/or methodical details must be provided for research articles.

There are, in addition, unique features of this journal:

Publisher(s): 

MDPI AG, a publisher of open-access scientific journals, was spun off from the Molecular Diversity Preservation International organization. It was formally registered by Shu-Kun Lin and Dietrich Rordorf in May 2010 in Basel, Switzerland, and maintains editorial offices in China, Spain and Serbia. MDPI relies primarily on article processing charges to cover the costs of editorial quality control and production of articles. Over 280 universities and institutes have joined the MDPI Institutional Open Access Program; authors from these organizations pay reduced article processing charges.

Fournisseur de données

MDPI AG, a publisher of open-access scientific journals, was spun off from the Molecular Diversity Preservation International organization. It was formally registered by Shu-Kun Lin and Dietrich Rordorf in May 2010 in Basel, Switzerland, and maintains editorial offices in China, Spain and Serbia. MDPI relies primarily on article processing charges to cover the costs of editorial quality control and production of articles. Over 280 universities and institutes have joined the MDPI Institutional Open Access Program; authors from these organizations pay reduced article processing charges.

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