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Emplacement

Nouvelle-Zélande
NZ

The Polynesian Maori reached New Zealand in about A.D. 800. In 1840, their chieftains entered into a compact with Britain, the Treaty of Waitangi, in which they ceded sovereignty to Queen Victoria while retaining territorial rights. That same year, the British began the first organized colonial settlement. A series of land wars between 1843 and 1872 ended with the defeat of the native peoples. The British colony of New Zealand became an independent dominion in 1907 and supported the UK militarily in both world wars. New Zealand's full participation in a number of defense alliances lapsed by the 1980s. In recent years, the government has sought to address longstanding Maori grievances. New Zealand assumed a nonpermanent seat on the UN Security Council for the 2015-16 term.

New Zealand is a parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarchy and a part of the Commonwealth realm.

Source: CIA World Factbook

Government of New Zealand Resources

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Réglementations
mars 1978
Nouvelle-Zélande

These Regulations, consisting of 12 sections, establish the requirements and conditions to request and benefit from an authorisation to entry to the Titi Islands and other islands adjacent to Stewart Island mentioned in the deed of cession of Stewart Island dated 29 June 1864.

Législation
janvier 1967
Nioué

This New Zealand Law, consisting of 33 Parts and 3 Schedules, provides for various matters that apply to the territory of Niue, including Village Councils, cases stated by the High Court or Land Court or Land Appellate Court and cases stated by Supreme Court for Land Appellate Court, land taxes and land development.

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