Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
Global Data Barometer
2 March 2021
Authors: 
Fiona Chawana
Global

We’re delighted to share the draft of our Land Governance module for a public review stage (until 15th March 2020). We are inviting feedback on our selection of indicators, and our draft research guidance, as we explore how the Global Data Barometer can track governance, availability and use of data related to land governance in our upcoming survey.

Second Arab Land Conference 2021
22 February 2021 to 24 February 2021

Location

Cairo
Egypt
EG
Algeria
Egypt
Libya
Morocco
Sudan
Jordan
Palestine
Saudi Arabia
Syrian Arab Republic
United Arab Emirates
Yemen

The Government of the Arab Republic of Egypt was pleased to announce the Second Arab Land Conference, organized under the patronage of the Egyptian Minister of Housing, Utilities and Urban Communities.

Organizers: 
Global Land Tool Network
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH
World Bank Group
Government of Egypt
Rolling back social and environmental safeguards in the name of COVID-19
18 February 2021

Location

Online
United States
US
Global

 

Organizers: 
Forest Peoples Programme
Land Portal Foundation
The Tenure Facility

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Countries

Malaysia comprises two main land masses. Peninsular (or West) Malaysia borders Singapore (via land bridges) and Thailand, while East Malaysia on the northern part of Borneo island borders Brunei and Indonesia. The Federation of Malaya was formed in 1948 and gained independence from British sovereignty in 1957. Malaysia was formed as a new Federation in 1963, bringing in the states of Singapore (temporarily until 1965), Sarawak and Sabah.

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cambodia fishing village

Land lies at the center of debates about Cambodia’s socio-economic development. Despite urbanization tendencies, agriculture remains the main source of income for over three quarter of the population. For farmers in the fertile lowlands, private land ownership rights have enabled recovery of their livelihoods after decades of violent conflict. Meanwhile, the resource-rich uplands and border areas have been the site of large-scale land acquisitions for cash crop production and extractive industries. 

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Issues

iv coast conflict.jpg

Conflict is a major cause and, in some cases, result of humanitarian crises. Conflict frequently overlaps with underlying social inequalities, poverty and high levels of vulnerability. Conflicts are direct threats to food security as they cause massive loss of life and therefore loss of workforce (which is particularly important, as agriculture tends to rely heavily on human labour), loss of vital livestock, and loss of land. Conflicts displace millions of people each year, often forcing them to flee with nothing and making them extremely reliant on the communities that offer them shelter and humanitarian aid. This can place unsustainable pressure on hosting communities that often face high levels of food insecurity and struggle to make ends meet.

Learn more about challenges concerning Land Conflicts

With secure land tenure, Indigenous Peoples and local communities can realize human rights, achieve economic growth, protect the environment, and maintain cultural integrity. For centuries, Indigenous Peoples and local communities (IPLCs) have used, managed and depended on collectively-held land for food supplies, cultural and spiritual traditions, and other livelihood needs. Historically governed through customary tenure systems rooted in community norms and practices that often go back centuries, governments often consider such community land as vacant, idle, or state-owned property.  Statutory recognition and protection of indigenous and community land rights continues to be a major challenge.

Learn more about challenges concerning Indigenous & Community Land Rights.

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