local communities related Blog post | Land Portal

local communities

Synonyms: 
community
communities
local community

Local community is a traditional collectivity with a range of powers covering a certain geographical area and an autonomous management structure.

Displaying 97 - 108 of 141
11 September 2020
Authors: 
Michael Brown
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia
Global

The global conservation community now faces the added challenge of Covid-19 on top of a longstanding set of complex conservation, sustainability, and development challenges. In the wake of this pandemic, return to business as usual is not a viable option. The existing systems and structures upon which conservation is based must evolve. Climate change, biodiversity conservation, and poverty elimination efforts have been further complicated by Covid-19, with the brunt of the pandemic borne most acutely by the poorest and most vulnerable.

4 August 2020
Authors: 
Omaira Bolanos
Latin America and the Caribbean

Many Latin American countries recognize the property rights of indigenous and Afro-descendant people, but those laws do little to protect women’s access to land


Latin America’s indigenous and Afro-descendant communities are facing not just one pandemic, but three. Women bear the brunt of them all, which threatens communities’ very survival.


Young champions – hope for Mongolia’s herding traditions
27 July 2020
Authors: 
Ms. Suvd Boldbaatar
Mongolia

“It's hard to find the right life partner in my soum (district). Most of the girls went to school, then to university in the city. Not many of them are good at herding.” 

Like most young women who grew up in the city, I usually think of herders as quiet men with closed faces that are wrinkled and burnt by the sun. Khuukhenduu Naranbold is quite the opposite. He is smooth-skinned with an open face and a big smile. Even though he is only 23 years old, he is self-confident and keen to talk.  

Khuukhenduu’s comments about marriage and herding were recorded in 2016 at the beginning of a five-year action research project on women’s land tenure security, called WOLTS. The project has focused on pastoralist communities affected by mining, and has involved repeated visits and evidence gathering in several communities in Mongolia and Tanzania. I have been a part of the WOLTS team since June 2016.

Khuukhenduu comes from Dalanjargalan in the Gobi Desert – an area of Mongolia where the traditional herding lifestyle is under threat, not only from mining but also because many young herder men are struggling to marry. This is because boys, especially in herding families, are expected to look after the family’s animals, while girls are more likely to finish school and go to university. Once the girls leave to study in the city, few want to return to the harsh herding lifestyle.

Although it is difficult to find a partner, Khuukhenduu is not unhappy. He is a keen horseman and very proud of his riding skills. He is a member of the Mongolian Federation of Horse Racing and Trainers, and he loves racing. Unlike most other herders, who have adopted Chinese motorcycles and modern clothes, he still herds his animals on horseback and often wears a beautiful red deel (traditional costume). 

However the nomadic herding life is difficult, and, although he lives in his own ger (traditional felted tent), Khuukhenduu stays close to his parents so that taking care of animals can be shared. At the same time, he uses social media to keep in touch with his school friends – and with girls.

This contrast between tradition and modern technology illustrates the tensions and rapid changes taking place in today’s herding lifestyle. Khuukhenduu has profound knowledge of nature and how to successfully make a living from the land. He also embraces the internet, and was an eager participant in our WOLTS training programme this year on gender, land rights and the law.

In his small community in Dalanjargalan, Khuukhenduu is already well known. Although he does not have high academic qualifications, he is a skilled manager who knows how to maintain pastureland and raise quality livestock. He is also a confident speaker and a natural leader, so it is not surprising that older participants in the WOLTS programme selected him to become a community champion on gender and land. In some ways in his everyday life he is just like a CEO – taking responsibility, always having to think about the future and plan for both the good times and the bad, while constantly carrying out a whole range of highly skilled herding activities.  

Mongolian masculinity is celebrated in July every year in the Naadam festival of the three ‘manly sports’ of horse riding, wrestling and archery. Khuukhenduu is a participant and fierce competitor in Naadam games – especially horse racing. But his skills, grounded in the country’s herding traditions, will be lost unless the country and the government support nomadic families to thrive. 

I often worry that our country does not put sufficient value on the traditional knowledge and skills of herding people. If the herders go, Mongolia will lose centuries of experience in sustainable land and animal management. If Khuukhenduu struggles to marry and raise a family, what hope is there for other young herders? 

The herding life is not for everyone, but I know that city life also has its problems. I also realise that knowledge often comes from life’s experiences, not only from books and university. As Mongolia looks for ways to develop new industries we need to remember our proud nomadic heritage and make sure we protect herders’ land rights, not only to support tourism but – most importantly – as the foundation for so many Mongolian families’ lives. As trained and respected community champions, thoughtful young leaders like Khuukhenduu are the very people who offer us hope for the future.

 

 

2 June 2020
Authors: 
Mr. Lorenzo Cotula
Niger
Sierra Leone
Colombia
Indonesia
Philippines
Global

Reports suggest the COVID-19 fallout is providing opportunities for elites to seize lands and rewrite regulations. We need effective responses to secure land rights and lay the foundations for a just recovery. 


 


22 May 2020
Authors: 
Shipra Deo
Mr. Pinaki Halder
India

The Government of India has announced an ambitious effort to map residential areas in villages using drone technology and provide “property cards” to these rural owners. In its first phase, the Svamitva (“Ownership”) scheme will map 100,000 villages in six states, with the scheme ultimately expanding to all of India’s 662,000 villages. 

How Anna Letaiko got her land
30 April 2020
Authors: 
Ezekiel Kereri
Tanzania

Anna Letaiko is a middle-aged woman with a soft voice that carries wisdom and strength. Her husband is an older man, and together they live in small mud house in Mundarara – a remote village in Longido district in Tanzania, accessible only by a rough dirt road. It is a Maasai community similar to the one in which I grew up, except that the community’s livelihood is based on mining and pastoralism while my community still depends on farming and pastoralism.

I met Anna through my work with WOLTS – a five-year action research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities that are affected by mining. As a speaker of the Maasai language, my job is to facilitate and translate in training sessions and help develop training materials.

In Maasai culture, it is very rare for women to own land. Men see themselves as owning land on behalf of the whole family. If women do apply for land, they usually apply in the name of their husband or son. 

However, the law in Tanzania (Land Act, 1999, and Village Land Act, 1999) grants women and men the same rights to land access, ownership and control. The law also says that women have the same rights in decision-making over land. What Maasai customs mean in practice is that women are denied the right to apply for land and own it themselves. 

During our research we heard that, when women in Mundarara applied for land in their own names, their applications were ignored, not taken seriously, and even thrown away. Some women were even asked for sex in exchange for land documents.

Our aim through the WOLTS project is to support the community to find their own solutions to land rights problems. To help them achieve this, we asked them to select community ‘champions’ who would be trained in land rights, mining laws, investment laws, mineral valuation and legal procedures for licence applications, as well as gender-based violence. 

Anna was one of the first champions to be trained in Mundarara. When we first started working in the community, Anna did not even know that she had the right to own land.  After the WOLTS training sessions, she put in an application, and it was taken seriously. 

A few months later, Anna received a small plot near the village centre where she wants to build a modern house. As a trained champion for gender equity, she has promised to help other women by raising awareness and assisting them to become land owners like herself.

The growth of artisanal mining in Mundarara has brought many changes to the community, including giving families new sources of income. Women are finding that they have more opportunities to earn money and participate in community and family decision-making, including through land ownership. 

Documenting and sharing Anna Letaiko’s story reminded me how quickly life is changing in pastoral districts due to factors like mining. I hope it will inspire readers, raise the voices of less fortunate groups, and improve everyday life in communities similar to my own.

 

A Miskito woman in Nicaragua. Photo: Jason Taylor/ILC.
22 April 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Michael Taylor
Global

This is a special Earth Day Op-Ed by Michel Forst, the UN special rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders and Michael Taylor, the Director of the International Land Coalition Secretariat.


jordan_landscape
17 April 2020
Authors: 
Joren Verbist
Jordan

Joren Verbist is a third-year undergraduate student undertaking a major in International land- and water management at the University of Wageningen (WUR).  He is also currently carrying out an internship at the International Centre of Agriculture Research Dryland Areas (ICARDA), in Amman, Jordan.  The below blog details some of his experiences, as well as preliminary information on his research. 

31 March 2020
Authors: 
Emmanuel Mbise
Tanzania

As a Swahili speaker from Tanzania, I have not often had the opportunity to meet or work with people from remote Maasai communities. However, I recently visited the villages of Naisinyai and Mundarara in the north of the country as part of a global research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities affected by mining (the WOLTS project).

Seats of power – women’s land rights and chairs
25 February 2020
Authors: 
Joyce Ndakaru
Tanzania

When I was young, I was taught through my Maasai heritage that a woman is the property of her husband and is valued on the basis of how many children she can produce – and not by her education or economic success. 

5 February 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Marc Wegerif
South Africa

The Parliament of South Africa has agreed to amend the Constitution of the country in order to make it explicit that it is possible to expropriate land without paying compensation in order to further land reforms. The supporters of this move - the ruling  African National Congress (ANC) and the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) – argue that this is necessary to speed up land reforms in order to overcome the continuing extreme and still largely racially defined inequalities in land ownership.

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Dynamic, agile and effective, the Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) is working to secure a world where natural habitats and environments can sustain, and be sustained by, the communities that depend upon them for their basic needs and livelihoods.

From the cotton fields of Uzbekistan to the coastal waters of West Africa, EJF is working in some of the world’s toughest and most remote countries to shine an international spotlight on the environmental and human rights abuses that too often go unnoticed.

 Núcleo Académico para o Desenvolvimento da Comunidade - NADEC logo

NADEC é uma pessoa Colectiva de Direitos privados, Sem fins lucrativos, fundada e registrada em 02 de Outubro de 2006, por um grupo de estudantes universitários nacionais, e lançada publicamente aos 29 de Setembro de 2007. É constituída por 16 membros e tem como o Responsável Sr. Hipólito Lourenço Benfica na qualidade de Presidente da Organização. Visão: Uma Sociedade livre de Injustiça em que as comunidades participam activamente na luta contra a pobreza. Missão: Emponderar as comunidades para que participem consistentemente nos processos de desenvolvimento local.

Vision

An empowered, equitable, socially cohesive and economically prosperous society in Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral.

Mission

To improve the quality of life of local communities through social and economic development efforts.

Objectives

Foster inclusive and competent local institutions of the people that contribute effectively and sustainably to local development

Increase income and employment opportunities for local communities, particularly poor and vulnerable (including youth and women)

Agrisud International logo

Entreprendre contre la pauvreté


 


Nous tous, chez Agrisud, n’acceptons pas l’idée qu’aujourd’hui 1,4 milliards de personnes puissent vivre en situation de pauvreté, avec le plus souvent de grandes difficultés pour se nourrir quotidiennement.


Au Sud comme au Nord, nous savons que cette situation est due très souvent à l’exclusion économique, pour des raisons multiples, qui elle-même entraîne progressivement l’exclusion sociale.


The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) is a non-governmental Indigenous Peoples organisation in Guyana. It is primarily an advocacy organisation that seeks to promote and defend the rights of the Indigenous Peoples of Guyana. 

Membership of the APA is made up of Units throughout the country, currently amounting to close to eighty such units. The Association is led by an Executive Committee comprising the President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Assistant Secretary/Treasurer, thirteen regional representatives, a women’s representative and a youth representative. 

APC Logo

APC is an international network of civil society organisations founded in 1990 dedicated to empowering and supporting people working for peace, human rights, development and protection of the environment, through the strategic use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). 

Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation logo

The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) is the largest and oldest academic society dedicated to the study and conservation of tropical ecosystems. Our society is international in scope and membership, with almost 900 members from 65 countries, with whom we seek to:


  1. Promote awareness to as broad an audience as possible of the importance of the tropics
  2. Improve communication and cooperation among tropical investigators, educators, environmental managers, and local communities

Belun was established in 2004 to prevent conflict and facilitate community capacity development in Timor-Leste. Belun’s work is grounded in the vision of a society that has the ability, creativity and criticalthinking to strengthen peace for development. Belun has grown to become one of the largest National nongovernment organisations in Timor-Leste and has engaged with over 100 non-government (NGO) and community-based organization (CBO) partners, .

Bertha Logo

Bertha Foundation fights for a more just world. We support activists, storytellers, and lawyers who are working to bring about social and economic justice and human rights for all.

Créée en 1998, Brainforest est une Organisation Non Gouvernementale de droit gabonais qui travaille sur la problématique Forêt – Environnement dans une double perspective d’appui sur le terrain et de suivi des politiques.

Camoes

A política de cooperação para o desenvolvimento portuguesa, que constitui um dos pilares da política externa, tem como objetivo fundamental a erradicação da pobreza extrema e o desenvolvimento sustentável dos países parceiros devendo ser entendida como um investimento e não como uma despesa, como desenvolvimento e não como assistencialismo. Baseia-se num modelo de gestão descentralizado e é enquadrada pelo Conceito Estratégico da Cooperação Portuguesa, 2014-2020.

Caritas Cambodia logo

Caritas Cambodia is an official social development arm of the Catholic Church in Cambodia. It has been built on the values of Love, Concern, Justice, Peace Unity, Sharing and brotherhood. It draws inspiration from the Gospel and aims at integral development of people irrespective of race and creed. Hence the objectives of Caritas Cambodia specifically include the following:

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