WORKING PAPER 01/2007: CORRUPTION AND RENEWABLE NATURAL RESOURCES | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

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Date of publication: 
January 2007
Pages: 
6
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There is important evidence to suggest that corruption is a key factor contributing to the degradation of renewable natural resources. Forestry officials and law enforcement officers who are in the pockets of corrupt logging firms often turn a blind eye to activities that threaten the sustainable management of a forest’s biodiversity. Similarly, fishery inspectors endanger stocks when they accept bribes to ignore official quotas for trawlers. Within countries, poor governance may translate into sub-standard environmental policies, leaving interest groups to determine the common ‘environmental good’. In extreme cases, high-level political corruption can facilitate the wholesale plunder of a country’s natural resources. This paper looks at the current findings and discourse surrounding corruption in three renewable natural resources: forestry, fisheries and wildlife.

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Translations: VI   ES   PT   FR  

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One global movement sharing one vision: a world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.

In 1993, a few individuals decided to take a stance against corruption and created Transparency International. Now present in more than 100 countries, the movement works relentlessly to stir the world’s collective conscience and bring about change. Much remains to be done to stop corruption, but much has also been achieved, including:

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About

One global movement sharing one vision: a world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.

In 1993, a few individuals decided to take a stance against corruption and created Transparency International. Now present in more than 100 countries, the movement works relentlessly to stir the world’s collective conscience and bring about change. Much remains to be done to stop corruption, but much has also been achieved, including:

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