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Showing items 1 through 9 of 42.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2006
    India, Australia, Kenya, Africa, Eastern Africa

    The need to increase water productivity is a growing global concern as the World Commission on Water has estimated that demand for water will increase by c. 50% over the next 30 years and approximately half of the world's population will experience conditions of severe water stress by 2025. Three-quarters of African countries are expected to experience unstable water supplies, whereby small decreases in rainfall induce much larger reductions in streamflow.

  2. Library Resource
    Regulations
    January, 2007
    Tanzania

    These Regulations, made by the Minister of State under sections 143, 144 and 230 of the Environmental Management Act, concern soil pollution and soil quality standards and provide with respect to a soil protection permit and compliance system. They also concern measures of enforcement.

  3. Library Resource
    National Policies
    January, 2007
    Eswatini

    The present Poverty Reduction Strategy and Action Plan (PRSAP) 2007 provides the framework for poverty focused planning and budgeting in the short to medium term. Poverty reduction will be central to all sectoral development plans and the medium term expenditure framework. Part 3 defines the Overarching Policy Objective as follows: The overriding goal of the PRSAP is to reduce poverty by more than 50% by 2015 and then ultimately eradicate it by 2022.

  4. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2006

    Agriculture is fundamental to achieving nutrition goals: it produces the food, energy, and nutrients essential for human health and well-being. Gains in food production have played a key role in feeding growing and malnourished populations. Yet they have not translated into a hunger-free world nor prevented the development of further nutritional challenges. Micronutrient deficiencies (for example, of vitamin A, iron, iodine, and zinc) are now recognized as being even more limiting for human growth, development, health, and productivity than energy deficits.

  5. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2006

    "With half the world’s population living in cities and towns, many poor urban dwellers face problems gaining access to adequate supplies of nutritionally balanced food. For many urban populations, an important source of food is urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA). Production and processing of crops—particularly horticultural crops—and livestock is frequently part of urban and peri-urban livelihood strategies, and the food produced forms a large part of informal sector economic activity.

  6. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2006

    "Agricultural production relies on environmental services to transform raw inputs into the nutritious and diverse food that humans rely on for survival. Although the practice of agriculture is essential for human health, careless and inappropriate agricultural practices can degrade and contaminate natural resources and in so doing, harm human health. Modified agricultural practices can help mitigate these problems.

  7. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2006

    "Agriculture is the main source of livelihood of the majority of people affected by HIV and AIDS globally, and it is being progressively undermined by the disease. In Sub-Saharan Africa AIDS is affecting the rural landscape in ways that demand a rethinking of development policy and practice, and parts of South Asia may soon face a similar situation.... There is clearly tremendous scope for agricultural policy to become more HIV-responsive, both to further AIDS-related objectives and to help achieve agricultural objectives. Yet there are no magic bullets.

  8. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    January, 2007
    South Africa

    At the end of Apartheid, approximately 82 million hectares of commercial farmland (86% of total agricultural land, or 68% of the total surface area) was in the hands of the white minority (10.9% of the population), and concentrated in the hands of approximately 60,000 owners (Levin and Weiner 1991: 92). Over thirteen million black people, the majority of them poverty-stricken, remained crowded into the former homelands, where rights to land were generally unclear or contested and the system of land administration was in disarray (Hendricks 1990; Cousins 1996; Lahiff 2000).

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