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Showing items 1 through 9 of 1426.
  1. Library Resource
    Masterclass Curriculum: Open Data in the Fight Against Corruption cover image
    Training Resources & Tools
    November, 2019
    Global

    The curriculum “​Open in Practice: Using Open Data, Knowledge Sharing and Information Management Systems in the Fight Against Land Corruption”​ is being developed to increase land professionals understanding of concepts relating to Corruption and Open Data, and identify how open land data can contribute to addressing the lack of transparency, poor accountability, and increase the participation of civil society actors in land administration, land-based investments & land policy related information.

  2. Library Resource
    The State of Support for Open Data in Land Governance cover image

    A Webinar report

    Reports & Research
    December, 2019
    Global

    This September, the Land Portal hosted an online dialogue on ‘Open Land Data in the Fight Against Corruption’. This responded to a dual recognition that corruption remains a major issue in land governance, and that open data has been identified as a powerful tool in the fight against corruption. At the same time, gaps remain between the promise and the reality of open data in the land sector. Poor data availability, underdeveloped theories of change, and a lack of implementation support have all contributed to slowerthan-desired progress in data publication and use over the last decade.

  3. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 12

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2019
    Global

    Biochar is one of the most affordable negative emission technologies (NET) at hand for future large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which is typically found essential to stabilizing global temperature rise at relatively low levels. Biochar has also attracted attention as a soil amendment capable of improving yield and soil quality and of reducing soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In this work, we review the literature on biochar production potential and its effects on climate, food security, ecosystems, and toxicity.

  4. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 12

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2019
    Global

    Companies and governmental agencies are increasingly seeking ways to explore emerging trends and issues that have the potential to shape up their future operational environments. This paper exploits text mining techniques for investigating future signals of the land administration sector. After a careful review of previous literature on the detection of future signals through text mining, we propose the use of topic models to enhance the interpretation of future signals.

  5. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 12

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2019
    Global

    The planting of sand-binding vegetation in the Qinghai Lake watershed at the northeastern edge of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau began in 1980. For this paper, we took the desert on the eastern shore of Qinghai Lake as the study area. We analyzed a variety of aged Hippophae rhamnoides communities and aeolian activities, and we discuss the relationship between them. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) With an increasing number of binding years, the species composition became more abundant, natural vegetation began to recover, and biodiversity increased year by year.

  6. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 11

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2019
    Global

    Te Tiriti o Waitangi, signed between Māori rangatira (chiefs) and the British Crown in 1840 guaranteed to Māori the ‘full, exclusive and undisturbed possession of their lands’. In the decades that followed, Māori were systematically dispossessed of all but a fraction of their land through a variety of mechanisms, including raupatu (confiscation), the individualisation of title, excessive Crown purchasing and the compulsory acquisition of land for public works.

  7. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 11

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2019
    Namibia, Global

    The negative impact of the reduction of vegetation cover is already being felt in the Zambezi Region in northeastern Namibia. The region has been undergoing various land cover changes in the past decades. To understand the historical trend of vegetation cover (increase or decrease), we analyzed 8-km resolution Global Inventory Monitoring and Modeling Studies (GIMMS) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and 0.25° × 0.25° (resampled to 8 km) resolution Global Precipitation Climatology Center (GPCC). We used the Time Series Segmented Residual Trends (TSS-RESTREND) method.

  8. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 11

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2019
    Global

    The use of land consolidation on customary lands has been limited, though land fragmentation persists. Land fragmentation on customary lands has two main causes—the nature of the customary land tenure system, and the somewhat linked agricultural system. Since attempts to increase food productivity on customary lands have involved fertilisation and mechanisation on the small and scattered farmlands, these approaches have fallen short of increasing food productivity.

  9. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 11

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2019
    Global

    Intensification of rainfed agriculture in the Ethiopian highlands has resulted in soil degradation and hardpan formation, which has reduced rooting depth, decreased deep percolation, and increased direct runoff and sediment transport. The main objective of this study was to assess the potential impact of subsoiling on surface runoff, sediment loss, soil water content, infiltration rate, and maize yield.

  10. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 11

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2019
    Global

    Based on research into the theory of household assets and the welfare of farmers, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP)-entropy weight method and cloud model were used to study the welfare level of land-lost farmers’ households under the different livelihood assets of Taohuayi Village, Taohuasan Village and Taohuawu Village in Taohua Town, Nanchang City. The results show that (1) The comprehensive welfare level of asset-deficient farmers’ households is between the “bad” and “medium” levels and is closer to the “bad” level.

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