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Showing items 1 through 9 of 4.
  1. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    February, 2018
    Nepal, Burkina Faso, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Malawi, Rwanda, Lesotho, Vietnam, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Ecuador, Senegal, Ethiopia, Niger, Uganda, Tajikistan

    Secure tenure rights and control over land for women and men farmers are key to boosting smallholder productivity, rural development and food security. However, in many parts of the world, men and women have inadequate access to secure property rights over land. Women are particularly disadvantaged: even though they constitute on average 43 percent of the agricultural labour force in developing countries, women’s ownership of agricultural land remains significantly lower than that of men.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2000
    Equatorial Guinea, United States of America, Nepal, Zambia, Sweden, Indonesia, Eswatini, United Kingdom, Canada, Congo, Pakistan, Finland, Cameroon, Kenya, Liberia, Malaysia, South Africa, Uganda, Papua New Guinea, India, Ireland, Gabon, Brazil

    In many countries around the world, people living in rural areas have lower incomes and are generally less prosperous than their urban counterparts. Because of this, governments often attempt to promote rural development through the development of natural resources such as forests. This paper will attempt to describe some of the challenges of using forest resources for rural development in developing countries.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    August, 2013
    Nepal

    the authors examine how economic activity and market participation are distributed across space. Applying a nonparametric von Thunen model to Nepalese data, the authors uncover a strong spatial division of labor. Nonfarm employment is concentrated in and around cities, while agricultural wage employment dominates villages located further away. Vegetables are produced near urban centers. Paddy and commercial crops are more important at intermediate distances. Isolated villages revert to self-subsistence.

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