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Showing items 1 through 9 of 14.
  1. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2009
    Namibia

    Land tenure in Namibia is regulated by a variety of Acts, some of which date back to as far as 1937, and some of which are

    yet to be approved by Cabinet. This variety of Acts makes it difficult to evaluate the performance of land administration as a

    whole, and the appropriateness of coercive instruments with regards to urban land tenure in particular. In this article we

    evaluate how urban land tenure regularization practices are conducted in Namibia, and to compare new formal procedures,

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2016
    Namibia

    ILMI is delighted to publish this bibliography in its Working Paper Series. It sees this as a small

    contribution to encourage and facilitate research on land reform in Namibia. Perhaps more

    ambitiously, this bibliography may serve as a starting point to collect the titles listed in order to

    strengthen the resource centre on land administration and land reform.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2015
    Namibia

    The Land, Livelihoods and Housing Programme aims at deepening and expanding the focus on these three key issues in Namibia. This thematic approach seeks to reflect the wide-ranging skills exiting at the FNRSS, and was developed to guide ILMI’s activities during the 2014-18 period. The programme is organised in four aspects: institutional, environmental, fiscal and spatial processes.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2015
    Namibia

    This Working Paper, the first in the series to be published by ILMI, will briefly review progress in both land reform sectors and raise a few issues that continue to pose challenges to the programme.

  5. Library Resource
    August, 2018
    Namibia

    This document outlines some pertinent questions regarding urbanization in Namibia, provides central policy recommendations and identifies relevant research gaps to guide the policy debate on urban land reform as part of the 2nd National Land Conference scheduled for 1-5 October 2018.

  6. Library Resource
    December, 2018

    Communal land is one of the land tenure systems in Namibia, the other being freehold land tenure system. At independence in 1990,Namibia resolved to retain communal land on the basis that majority of the population derived their livelihoods from communal land.Notwithstanding the increasing urban population in the country since independence, the majority of the Namibian population still lives in the communal areas, and many of the urban-based population continue to have close relations in rural areas.

  7. Library Resource
    December, 2018

    There has been rapid growth in urban populations in Namibia (Pendleton et al, 2014). This growth is amongst predominantly amongst less educated, poorer migrants from rural areas in search of opportunities in urban areas. From the data available the estimated shortfall of either titled land or houses appears to be above 150 000 and increasing at about 11 000 per year (Weber, 2017). This trend of urbanisation is occurring not only in Namibia but across the world, particularly now in developing countries.

  8. Library Resource
    December, 2018

    Ancestral land refers to ‘land of ancestors’. That is the land occupied by ones’ forebearers for generations and left something behind of value for current and future generations. There are usually contestations as to which ancestors the land

    belongs because of the history of internal migration and of displacements by stronger nations (tribes).

  9. Library Resource
    December, 2018

    Namibia is moving towards an urbanised country. This is illustrated by the fact that at independence Namibia was only 28% urbanized by 2011 urbanization has already grown to 42% and current projections are that by 2020 urbanization would by 66% and more than 70% by 2030. As the urban population is growing the need for serviced land and housing is also growing. As Namibia has failed to respond through appropriate strategies to facilitate this change in the human geography of the country it resulted in the growth of poorly serviced informal settlements.

  10. Library Resource
    December, 2018

    Namibia is compelled to observe and to undertake efforts to realise the right to adequate housing, since it has ratified the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in 1994.

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