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Showing items 1 through 9 of 13.
  1. Library Resource

    Local sustainable development solutions for people, nature, and resilient communities

    Reports & Research
    December, 2004
    Thailand

    Local and indigenous communities across the world are advancing innovative sustainable development solutions that work for people and for nature. Few publications or case studies tell the full story of how such initiatives evolve, the breadth of their impacts, or how they change over time. Fewer still have undertaken to tell these stories with community practitioners themselves guiding the narrative. The Equator Initiative aims to fill that gap.

  2. Library Resource

    Evidence from 33 Countries

    Reports & Research
    March, 2019
    Morocco, Tunisia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Cameroon, Namibia, Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Costa Rica, Honduras, Mexico, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Jordan, United Kingdom

    This report uses household-level data from 33, mostly developing, countries to analyse perceptions of tenure insecurity among women. We test two hypotheses: (1) that women feel more insecure than men; and (2) that increasing statutory protections for women, for instance by issuing joint named titles or making inheritance law more gender equal, increases de facto tenure security.

  3. Library Resource

    Evidence from 33 Countries

    Reports & Research
    March, 2019
    Morocco, Tunisia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Cameroon, Namibia, Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Costa Rica, Honduras, Mexico, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Jordan, United Kingdom

    A deeper look at what the results of the 33 wave 1 and 2 countries show about urban land tenure security. This report compliments the Prindex Comparative Report by focusing on a specific aspect of land and tenure insecurity.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    March, 2019
    Morocco, Tunisia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Cameroon, Namibia, Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Costa Rica, Honduras, Mexico, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Jordan, United Kingdom

    Property rights are a cornerstone of economic development and social justice. A fundamental way of understanding the strength of property rights is through citizens' perceptions of them. Yet perceptions of tenure security have never been collected at a global scale.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2015
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    With a focus on the Lower Mekong countries, this study considers the intersecting issues of land access, livelihoods, management of risk and poverty for men and women smallholder farmers, the land poor and the landless, and how these issues might be addressed in policy and practice. While there has recently been insightful analysis concerning land access, livelihoods, and global land insecurity, we know much less regarding specific mechanisms that keep rural agricultural smallholders and the landless or land poor struggling and it is these issues that we address within this report

  6. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2016
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Vietnam

    ABSTRACTED FROM EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Land rights systems in Southeast Asia are in constant flux; they respond to various socioeconomic and political pressures and to changes in statutory and customary law. Over the last decade, Southeast Asia has become one of the hotspots of the global land grab phenomenon, accounting for about 30 percent of transnational land grabs globally. Land grabs by domestic urban elites, the military or government actors are also common in many Southeast Asian countries.

  7. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2015
    Global, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, China, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Philippines, Thailand, Uganda, Zambia

    In this publication, the issue of tenure security is addressed and assessed in several countries where government, civil society, the private sector and development cooperation initiatives have been implemented for decades. The selected case studies from fifteen countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America ensure not only a eographic balance but they also represent countries with different socio-economic and land-related histories and that have followed different pathways. The studies’ key findings underline the still precarious state of tenure security in many countries.

  8. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2011
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    ABSTRACTED FROM THE SUMMARY: Land-grabbing is occurring at a significant extent and pace in Southeast Asia; some of the characteristics of this land grab differ from those in regions such as Africa. At a glance, Europe is not a high profile, major driver of land-grabbing in this region, but a closer examination reveals that it nonetheless is playing a significant role. This influence is both direct and indirect, through European corporate sector and public policies, as well as through multilateral agencies within which EU states are members.

  9. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2012
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    The Land Matrix project was set up to respond to the lack of widely available, reliable data on large-scale land transactions in the Global South. It collates and evaluates data from a wide range of sources on large transnational transactions in the agricultural sector and other sectors. This report represents the first thorough analysis of the Land Matrix database.

  10. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2013
    Global, Thailand

    The Coca-Cola Company believes that land grabbing is unacceptable. Our Company does not typically purchase ingredients directly from farms, nor are we owners of sugar farms or plantations, but as a major buyer of sugar, we acknowledge our responsibility to take action and to use our influence to help protect the land rights of local communities. The Coca-Cola Company commits to the following plan of action to prevent and address land grabs and other land controversies in our supply chain.

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