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Showing items 1 through 9 of 26.
  1. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2004
    Eastern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Africa, Uganda

    The government of Uganda, with help from its development partners, is designing and implementing policies and strategies to address poverty, land degradation, and declining agricultural productivity. Land degradation, especially soil erosion and depletion of soil nutrients, is widespread in Uganda and contributes to declining productivity, which in turn increases poverty.

  2. Library Resource
    Peer-reviewed publication
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2004
    Eastern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Africa, Uganda

    This paper investigates the patterns and determinants of change in income strategies ("development pathways"), land management, resource and human welfare conditions in Uganda since 1990, based upon a community-level survey conducted in 107 villages. Six dominant development pathways were found, all but one of which involved increasing specialization in already dominant activities. Of these, expansion of banana and coffee production was most associated with adoption of resource-conserving practices and improvements in resource conditions and welfare.

  3. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2004

    This brief describes two case studies as follows: "Sub-Saharan Africa, with the highest fertility rate in the world, faces increasing demographic pressure on its natural resource base.... Old strategies for coping with these new pressures on the natural resource base are becoming increasingly infeasible... Consequently, Africa's farmers require new solutions to address the increasing pressure on the continent's soil and water resources. Among hundreds of innovative efforts across the continent, two promising sets of responses have emerged in different locations....

  4. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2004

    Fisheries are complex and interdependent ecological and social systems that require integrated management approaches. The actions of one person or group of users affect the availability of the resource for others. Managing such common pool resources requires conscious efforts by a broad range of stakeholders to organize and craft rules enabling equitable and sustainable use of the resources for everyone?s benefit. Collective action is often a prerequisite for the development of community-based institutions and the devolution of authority...

  5. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2004

    This brief defines property rights and collective action and discusses the links to sustainability of natural resource management and agricultural systems and to poverty reduction, as well as the implications for policy and practice.

  6. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2004
    Western Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Africa, Burkina Faso

    "This paper describes the emergence of improved traditional planting pits (zaï) in Burkina Faso in the early 1980s as well as their advantages, disadvantages and impact. The zaï emerged in a context of recurrent droughts and frequent harvest failures, which triggered farmers to start improving this local practice. Despair triggered experimentation and innovation by farmers. These processes were supported and complemented by external intervention. Between 1985 and 2000 substantial public investment has taken place in soil and water conservation (SWC).

  7. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2004

    In this brief, we explore the role that social institutions -specifically property rights and collective action - may play in the development of agroforestry.... In the future, property rights and collective action will play increasingly pivotal roles in defining rights and responsibilities over the externalities of tree management practices.

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