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Showing items 1 through 9 of 4.
  1. Library Resource
    Securing Forest Tenure Rights for Rural Development: Lessons from Six Countries in Latin America cover image
    Journal Articles & Books
    March, 2017
    Latin America and the Caribbean, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Argentina, Colombia, Peru

    Secure land tenure in rural landscapes is widely recognized as an essential foundation for achieving a range of economic development goals. However, forest areas in low and middle-income countries face particular challenges in strengthening the security of land and resource tenure. Forest peoples are often among the poorest and most politically marginalized communities in their national contexts, and their tenure systems are often based on customary, collective rights that have insufficient formal legal protection.

  2. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    March, 2016
    Kenya

    A Land Information Management System (LIMS) is an information system that enables the capture, management, and analysis of geographically referenced land-related data in order to produce land information for decision-making in land administration and management. The system is a Geospatial Information System (GIS) driven for the purposes of handling and managing parcel based information. The Republic of Kenya, located in East Africa, ranks 33rd in the world in terms of population with 38.6 million people and has a land area of 224,081 square miles.

  3. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    March, 2017
    Kenya

    While women’s rights to land and property are protected under the Kenyan Constitution of 2010 and in various national statutes, in practice, women remain disadvantaged and discriminated. The main source of restriction is customary laws and practices, which continue to prohibit women from owning or inheriting land and other forms of property.

  4. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    March, 2017
    Kenya

    Women face many problems with regard to land inheritance and land rights in Kenya. Individual and community land ownership do not favour women. The reason for this is that ownership of land is patrilineal, which means that fathers share land amongst sons, while excluding daughters. This practice is traditionally widespread and partly accepted although it goes against the interest of women and is prohibited by the constitution.

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