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Showing items 1 through 9 of 4.
  1. Library Resource
    Conference Papers & Reports
    December, 2016
    Mozambique

    Mozambique's Niassa Reserve contains Africa's best preserved miombo woodlands. Half of the households there gather wild honey from natural hives for consumption and income. However, most collectors used destructive techniques: setting fire to the grasses under the hive tree to create smoke and then felling the tree. Cutting trees to obtain honey was the principal source of tree mortality. Trees grow very slowly, about 0.25 cm diameter at breast hight [dbh] per year, meaning an average hive tree was nearly 200 years old.

  2. Library Resource
    Conference Papers & Reports
    December, 2016
    Mozambique

    Mozambique's Niassa Reserve contains Africa's best preserved miombo woodlands. Half of the households there gather wild honey from natural hives for consumption and income. However, most collectors used destructive techniques: setting fire to the grasses under the hive tree to create smoke and then felling the tree. Cutting trees to obtain honey was the principal source of tree mortality. Trees grow very slowly, about 0.25 cm diameter at breast hight [dbh] per year, meaning an average hive tree was nearly 200 years old.

  3. Library Resource
    Conference Papers & Reports
    December, 2016
    Mozambique

    This study evaluated the conservation status of tree populations and the impact of illegal logging in the Niassa National Reserve, a huge protected area in northern Mozambique, bordering Tanzania. The Miombo woodland around 8 villages was sampled on 43 transects laid out from log patios showing evidence of felling. Standing trees and stumps of 8 timber species (P. angolensis, A. quanzensis, M. sthulmannii, B. africana, C. imberbe, D. melanoxylon, P. angolensis and S. madagascariensis) were identified, quantified and measured.

  4. Library Resource

    Research on climate change in the districts of Chókwè and Matutuíne

    Conference Papers & Reports
    December, 2016
    Mozambique

    The Centro Terra Viva (CTV), in partnership with the World Resources Institute (WRI), promoted the implementation of the project on ‘documentation of unplanned human responses to climate change’. This project was part of a more general WRI approach, involving other countries, to research how communities in Africa are responding to climate change and the effect of these responses on the environment and biodiversity.

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