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Showing items 1 through 9 of 33.
  1. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2017

    Farmer-led investments in agricultural land and water management (ALWM) are transforming livelihoods and food security across South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Potential exists for even greater benefits, for even more beneficiaries. Understanding what factors influence adoption and impact of ALWM interventions can help ensure sustainable, positive effects of future investments. WLE has designed a suite of tools and investment models to support policy makers and development agents to leverage and extend the investments farmers are already making.

  2. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    August, 2018

    A water and soil quality baseline study was carried out across the ~ 4500 km2 Vientiane Plain in Lao PDR. Eight water quality and nine soil parameters were analysed using field kits at 95 sites in March 2015. Elevated electrical conductivity and chloride were apparent at two sites due to geogenic leaching from the marine rock-salt present in some areas. Groundwater was acidic in most locations. Nitrate and faecal contamination were also observed from nitrogenous fertilizers (diffuse) and from leaky sewage pits (localised) respectively.

  3. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2018
    Ethiopia

    Land degradation is a major challenge limiting crop production in Ethiopia. Integrated soil and water conservation is widely applied as a means to reverse the trend and increase productivity. This study investigated the effects of such integrated approaches at two sites, Jeldu and Diga, in Western Ethiopia. A split plot design with physical soil and water conservation in the main plots and agronomic practices in the sub plots was employed.

  4. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2016
    Tanzania, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Southern Africa

    Irrigation development in Sub-Saharan Africa has lagged significantly behind that in other developing countries. Consequently, economic development and food security are also lagging behind. Since the mid-2000s there has been a resurgence in the willingness to invest in irrigation, and Sub-Saharan Africa has the largest potential of any developing region to benefit from it. However, to gain from new investment in irrigation without repeating past failures, it is critical to develop a business model for small-scale irrigation schemes.

  5. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    March, 2014
    Burkina Faso, Western Africa

    In Burkina Faso, more than two-thirds of the population relies on rain-fed agriculture for food and income. However, scarce and insufficient water or irregular rainfall frequently puts farmers at risk of losing their crops. Climate change is making already variable rainfall less reliable. Yet all kinds of water users—farmers, fishers, livestock herders, domestic users, city dwellers, emerging industries–and ecosystems depend on access to water of the right quality, in the right quantity, and at the right time.

  6. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2018

    Women play an increasingly greater role in agriculture. Ensuring that they have opportunities—equal to those of men—to participate in transforming agriculture is a prerequisite for sustainable intensification. Increased gender equity in agriculture is both a practical and a social justice issue: practical because women are responsible for much of the production by smallholders; and social justice because in many cases they currently do not have rights over land and water resources, nor full access to markets, and often they do not even control the crops they produce.

  7. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2018

    Women play an increasingly greater role in agriculture. Ensuring that they have opportunities—equal to those of men—to participate in transforming agriculture is a prerequisite for sustainable intensification. Increased gender equity in agriculture is both a practical and a social justice issue: practical because women are responsible for much of the production by smallholders; and social justice because in many cases they currently do not have rights over land and water resources, nor full access to markets, and often they do not even control the crops they produce.

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