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Showing items 1 through 9 of 75.
  1. Library Resource
    China: Real Property Law
    Reports & Research
    October, 2014
    China

    Individuals cannot privately own land in China but may obtain transferrable land-use rights for a number of years for a fee. Currently, the maximum term for urban land-use rights granted for residential purposes is seventy years. In addition, individuals can privately own residential houses and apartments on the land (“home ownership”), although not the land on which the buildings are situated.

  2. Library Resource
    Legislation
    August, 2016
    Kenya

    This Act makes provision for the recognition, protection and registration of community land rights and also provides for conversion of community land, special rights and entitlements with respect to community land, environment and natural resources management of community land and settlement of disputes relating to community land.

  3. Library Resource
    Regulations
    January, 2011
    Georgia

    The regulation establishes privatization prices for state-owned agricultural land according to categories (broken down for each municipality of Georgia); and annual use fee for the state-owned agricultural land that may not be privatized (broken down into the following categories: pasture land, and pasture land in Akhmeta and Dedoplistskaro municipalities) (2 annexes).

    Implements: Law No. 3512-bc “On public property”. (2014-05-29)

  4. Library Resource
    Legislation
    November, 2008
    Bosnia and Herzegovina

    This Law lays down the general interest principles regarding the acquisition, seizure, use, disposal, protection and termination of rights on property, including several deriving real estate/physical property rights, also in relation with state property (public land).

  5. Library Resource
    National Policies
    June, 2006
    Nigeria

    The overall objective of the present national cross-sectoral Forest Policy is to achieve sustainable forest management that would ensure sustainable increases in the economic, social and environmental benefits from forests and trees for the present and future generation including the poor and the vulnerable groups.

  6. Library Resource
    Legislation
    February, 2012
    Estonia

    The Act provides the restrictions on the acquisition of immovables used as profit yielding land arising from public interest and the restrictions on the acquisition of immovables arising from national security reasons. For the purposes of the Act, public interest is, in particular, development of the management for specific purposes and sustainable management of immovables used as profit yielding land which contain agricultural and forest land.

  7. Library Resource
    Legislation
    January, 2000
    Montenegro

    This Law sets the necessary rules and provisions as regards the expropriation of land (the deprivation or restriction of property rights on immovable/real estate/land parcels and similar when required by the public interest, with a fair compensation).The expropriation procedure and the bodies for its implementation are also defined by this Law.The Law is divided into VI Chapters and 63 articles, including specific compensation issues (see Chapter V).

  8. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    August, 2015
    Kenya

    In Kenya, insecure land tenure and inequitable access to land, forest and water resources have contributed to conflict and violence, which has in turn exacerbated food insecurity. To address these interlinked problems, a new set of laws and policies on food security and land governance are currently being introduced or designed by the Government of Kenya. The new Food Security Bill explicitly recognizes the link between food security and land access, and the 2012 land laws target the corrupt system of land administration that made much of Kenya’s land grabbing possible.

  9. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    March, 2017
    Kenya

    Women face many problems with regard to land inheritance and land rights in Kenya. Individual and community land ownership do not favour women. The reason for this is that ownership of land is patrilineal, which means that fathers share land amongst sons, while excluding daughters. This practice is traditionally widespread and partly accepted although it goes against the interest of women and is prohibited by the constitution.

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