Search results | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

Land Library Search

Through our robust search engine, you can search for any item of the over 50,000 highly curated resources in the Land Library. 

If you would like to find an overview of what is possible, feel free to peruse the Search Guide


Search results

Showing items 1 through 9 of 16.
  1. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    December, 2015
    Global, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    Research indicates that key parameters of “land grabbing” differ across regions (e.g., ILC 2012) – particularly in view of who invests and/or when the bulk of investments occurred. At the same time, my review of the “land grab” literature since 2008 reveals that hardly any comparative assessments of “land grabbing” from a home country perspective exist that study whether and/or in which way and why “land grabs” of a single investor country differ across regions.

  2. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    December, 2015
    Cambodia, Thailand

    Chongjom border is a contested area which reflects power-related relationship between center and its marginal space. From deserted borderland in the buffer zone during Khmer Rouge period, Chongjom becomes an emerging 4th ranking of cross-border trading between Thailand and Cambodia, where value of exporting goods have been increased up to 224.05 % in 2013. The politics of changes in land use and property relations change lead to widen of land grabbing in the area.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2011
    Thailand

    OVERVIEW: Thailand is facing the challenges of a transition from lower- to upper-middle-income status. After decades of very rapid growth followed by more modest 5–6% growth after the Asian financial crisis of 1997–98, Thailand achieved a per capita GNI of US $3670 by 2008, reduced its poverty rate to less than 10% and greatly extended coverage of social services. Infant mortality has been cut to only 13 per 1000, and 98% of the population has access to clean water and sanitation.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2015
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    PUBLISHER'S ABSTRACT: The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 13 September 2007. Since then, the importance of the role that indigenous peoples play in economic, social and environmental conservation through traditional sustainable agricultural practices has been gradually recognized.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2014
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    ABSTRACTED FROM EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: This report deals with land concessions in Cambodia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Thailand – a much contended topic which leads discussants from issues such as land ownership and utilization to social structures, human rights and beyond. Overall, this report aims to examine changes in relative competitiveness in selected tradable commodities of Thailand and whether they are impacted through increases of land concession in selected countries in the subregion.

  6. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2011
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    ABSTRACTED FROM THE SUMMARY: Land-grabbing is occurring at a significant extent and pace in Southeast Asia; some of the characteristics of this land grab differ from those in regions such as Africa. At a glance, Europe is not a high profile, major driver of land-grabbing in this region, but a closer examination reveals that it nonetheless is playing a significant role. This influence is both direct and indirect, through European corporate sector and public policies, as well as through multilateral agencies within which EU states are members.

  7. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2008
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    China's economic rise and consequent demand for a reliable and steady supply of inexpensive natural resources have led to a rapid increase in Chinese foreign direct investment stretching all the way to Africa and Latin America. Southeast Asia's Mekong region is no exception to that trend. This policy brief highlights China's emerging role in finance and trade in three selected Mekong region countries (Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam).

  8. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    December, 2011
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    Debates and critiques around land policy often focus on the neo-liberal agenda of formalising land as alienable property, most notably through land titling schemes. Sometimes these schemes are posited against alternatives such as land reform and community land holding under common property arrangements. Claims and counter- claims are made for land titling as a means to boost smallholder security in the face of involuntary or otherwise unfair alienation of land sometimes under the rubric of land grabbing.

  9. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2012
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    The Land Matrix project was set up to respond to the lack of widely available, reliable data on large-scale land transactions in the Global South. It collates and evaluates data from a wide range of sources on large transnational transactions in the agricultural sector and other sectors. This report represents the first thorough analysis of the Land Matrix database.

  10. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012
    Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam

    The author argues that the democratic reform in Myanmar is rooted in profound internal and external factors. Since the beginning of the reform, the changes in Myanmar have taken tolls in a series of China’s existing interests inside the country. Economically, Chinese investments have come under increasing scrutiny, criticism, and even oppositions, threatening the viability of strategic projects such as the oil and gas pipelines. Politically, the initial success of the democratic reform in Myanmar raises questions about Beijing’s continuous resistance to reform.

Share this page