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Showing items 1 through 9 of 16.
  1. Library Resource
    Webinar Report: Land in Post-Conflict Settings
    Reports & Research
    June, 2019
    Uganda, Myanmar, Global

    Post-war societies not only have to deal with continuing unpeaceful relations but also land-related conflict legacies, farmland and forest degradation, heavily exploited natural resources, land mines, a destroyed infrastructure, as well as returning refugees and ex-combatants. In the aftermath of war, access to and control of land often remains a sensitive issue which may precipitate tensions and lead to a renewed destabilization of volatile post-conflict situations.

  2. Library Resource
    Cover photo
    Conference Papers & Reports
    October, 2012
    Tanzania

    Contemporary waves of large scale land acquisitions for commercial production in developing countries in Africa and other parts of the world have been branded as ‘land grabs’ by many scholars, media and activists. Some scholars have describe this phenomena as the “new scramble for Africa” (Moyo and Yeros, 2011). However, others have refuted such a description on the grounds that the current land deals are being negotiated by sovereign African states in the exercise of powers that they have under national laws (Odhiambo, 2011).

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    October, 2012
    Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia

    Large-scale land acquisitions by investors, which are often called ‘land grabs’ (see next section for de nition), can deprive rural women and communities of their livelihoods and land, increasing their food insecurity. This report argues that the current rise in land grabbing needs to be urgently addressed, and focuses
    on the actions that developing countries can take to mitigate land grabs through strengthening national land governance so that it is transparent, is accountable and protects communities’ rights.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2014
    Uganda

    In a first study of this kind, International Justice Mission has used mixed methods assessment to portray the depth of widow and orphan property grabbing problem and lack of justice system response in Mukono County, Uganda. The report demonstrates that nearly a third of widows have experienced land grabbing with virtually no criminal justice system response.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    September, 2016
    Australia, Global, Honduras, India, Mozambique, Peru, Sri Lanka

    Since 2009, Oxfam and others have been raising the alarm about a great global land rush. Millions of hectares of land have been acquired by investors to meet rising demand for food and biofuels, or for speculation. This often happens at the expense of those who need the land most and are best placed to protect it: farmers, pastoralists, forest-dependent people, fisherfolk, and indigenous peoples.
     

  6. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    March, 2016
    Eastern Africa, Ethiopia

    On September 15, 2015, the World Bank announced US$600 million of financing for a new initiative in Ethiopia, Enhancing Shared Prosperity through Equitable Services (ESPES). Its purported aim, like its predecessor, the Promoting Basic Services (PBS) program, is expanding access to basic services such as water, education, and healthcare.

  7. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2013
    Kenya

    News, views and experiences of policy-makers, practitioners and communities on making rangelands secure for local users

  8. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    Ethiopia

    The Ethiopian government has committed egregious human rights abuses to make way for agricultural land investments, in direct violation of international law, said the Oakland Institute in a new briefing paper released in New Delhi today. The briefing paper, entitled "Unheard Voices: The Human Rights Impact of Land Investments on Indigenous Communities in Gambella,” calls on Ethiopia to put an end to the illegal forced evictions of indigenous peoples in areas targeted for land investment.

  9. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2012
    Kenya

    The LAPSSET Corridor project, a major infrastructure development project that will run from Kenya to South Sudan and Ethiopia, will impact, positively or negatively, on the lives of more than 100 million people in the three countries. Indigenous peoples will potentially suffer the most negative impacts as a result of their having been historically marginalized economically, socially and politically. The recent discovery of oil in Turkana will add to the suffering of the Turkana peoples.

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