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Showing items 1 through 9 of 8.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2009
    France, North Macedonia, Belgium, Azerbaijan, Germany, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Bulgaria, Estonia, Pakistan, Nepal, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Moldova, Albania, Romania, Poland, India, Russia, Georgia, Armenia

    This publication describes the experience of a number of transition countries in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union with crafting regulatory frameworks for irrigation water users’ organizations. It also seeks to distil a number of key regulatory requirements. As a result, this study serves as a design/drafting manual for policymakers and for drafters of legislation on water users’ organizations.

  2. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    August, 2016
    Namibia, Ghana, Peru, Kyrgyzstan, China, India

    The aims to understand how formalizing or securing rights to collectively held lands can affect women and men differently and how projects and interventions can best address gender differences. It synthesizes findings from six case studies – from China, Ghana, India, the Kyrgyz Republic, Namibia, and Peru – that assess interventions to strengthen collective tenure and ensure that both women and men benefit from the improved land tenure security.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    September, 2016
    Australia, Global, Honduras, India, Mozambique, Peru, Sri Lanka

    Since 2009, Oxfam and others have been raising the alarm about a great global land rush. Millions of hectares of land have been acquired by investors to meet rising demand for food and biofuels, or for speculation. This often happens at the expense of those who need the land most and are best placed to protect it: farmers, pastoralists, forest-dependent people, fisherfolk, and indigenous peoples.
     

  4. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    February, 2015
    Cambodia, India, Indonesia

    This briefing paper is an outcome of the project "Strengthening the Documentation and Advocacy Capacity of Indigenous Women for the Advancement of their Rights and Welfare on Land" implemented in Cambodia, India and Indonesia in 2013-2014.

  5. Library Resource
    June, 2012
    India

    In India, land continues to be of
    enormous economic, social, and symbolic relevance. The main
    purpose of this report is to review new empirical evidence
    on land administration and land policy, as well as the
    possible interaction between the two, to derive policy
    conclusions. The empirical basis for the discussion of land
    administration is provided by a review of land records,
    survey and settlement, and land registration in 14 states.

  6. Library Resource
    February, 2013
    India

    This note summarizes the key findings of
    the attached consultant report. India is still primarily a
    rural, agrarian economy in which land use and land rights
    are an emotional issue. Prior to 1990 the presumption was
    that only residual land (non agricultural) would be made
    available for industrial use and because the state was the
    principal industrial investor the state would acquire any
    land needed. After 1990 the expectation was that private

  7. Library Resource
    September, 2013
    India

    In India, land continues to be of
    enormous economic, social, and symbolic relevance. The way
    in which land can be accessed and its ownership documented
    is at the core of the livelihood of the large majority of
    the poor, especially in rural and tribal areas and
    determines the extent to which increasingly scarce natural
    resources are managed. Land policies and administration are
    critical determinants of the transaction cost associated

  8. Library Resource
    International Conventions or Treaties
    January, 1979
    Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, North Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Eswatini, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) - currently ratified by 187 countries - is the only human rights treaty that deals specifically with rural women (Art. 14). Adopted in 1979 by the United Nations Generally Assembly, entered into force in 1981. The Convention defines discrimination against women as follows:

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