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Showing items 1 through 9 of 8.
  1. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2010
    Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Honduras, India, Iran, Kenya, Laos, Malawi, Mexico, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, South Africa, Sudan, Thailand, Vietnam, Zimbabwe, Southern Africa, South America, Western Africa, Middle Africa, Eastern Africa, Central America, Western Asia, Northern Africa, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

    IN response to an on-line survey, 76 project leaders and staff gave CPWF Phase 1 a

    generally favorable review. Respondents came from 68 CPWF projects in 45 countries on

    three continents. The survey sought to help learn what went well in Phase 1, what did not

    go so well and can be improved in Phase 2.

    Nearly three-quarters of respondents felt that they had achieved different research results,

    outcomes and impacts as a result of participation in the CPWF than otherwise possible from

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    June, 2006
    Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chile, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Hungary, India, Iran, Kenya, Laos, Mali, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, South Africa, Sudan, Thailand, Uganda, Vietnam, Zimbabwe, Western Africa, Middle Africa, Central America, South America, Western Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

    This introductory section covers the period since the submission of the last Mid-Term

    Plan until present, and concentrates on the following areas:

    > Principal areas of progress.

    > Developments in 2005 and early 2006.

    > Changes to the CPMT strategic plan.

    > Research achievement highlights.

    > Program progress.

    At this point – just under half way (two years and six months) in the implementation

    of the first CPWF phase (and three-and-a-half years since inception began)

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    April, 2004
    Bangladesh, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Kenya, Laos, Malawi, Mali, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, South Africa, Sudan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe, Western Africa, Middle Africa, Eastern Africa, Central America, South America, Western Asia, Northern Africa, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Africa

    In the months since approval in November 2002, the Challenge Program on Water and Food

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    June, 2006
    Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Ghana, Honduras, India, Iran, Kenya, Laos, Mali, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, South Africa, Sudan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe, Colombia, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Middle Africa, Central Asia, Eastern Africa, Central America, South America, Western Asia, Northern Africa, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Africa, Western Africa

    At this point – just under half way (two years and six months) in the implementation of the first CPWF phase (and three years and eight months since inception began) governance and management processes are running smoothly, it is in reasonable financial health and technical processes – such as issuing new calls and obtaining reviews by our Expert Panel on Scientific Quality – are familiar, although they must be adjusted to each specific instance.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2010
    Bangladesh, Honduras, United States of America, Kenya, Mali, Guatemala, Bolivia, Suriname, Malawi, Ethiopia, Thailand, Nigeria, Nepal, Nicaragua, Tajikistan, Colombia, Cambodia, Paraguay, Vietnam, Ghana, Europe, Africa, Asia, Northern America

    Land Tenure Working Paper 15. This publication brings to light the existing linkages between land tenure and the realization of the right to food. It points out that responsible governance of land requires the adoption of human rights-based approach in order to develop coherent and long term solutions to improve people’s livelihoods. The document presents the legal implications of the right to food at national level and provides a series of examples on the implementation of human rights principles and obligations into land tenure systems, policies, and institutional frameworks.

  6. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2012
    Angola, Algeria, Egypt, Bangladesh, Niger, Liechtenstein, Somalia, Namibia, Bulgaria, Bolivia, Ghana, Pakistan, Cape Verde, Jordan, Liberia, Libya, Vietnam, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Tanzania, Portugal, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Paraguay, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Slovenia, Burkina Faso, Slovakia, Mauritania, Croatia, Chile, China, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Jamaica, Djibouti, Guinea, Finland, Uruguay, Thailand, Seychelles, Nepal, Laos, Yemen, Philippines, South Africa, Kiribati, Uganda, Syrian Arab Republic, Nicaragua, Kazakhstan, Niue, Dominica, Benin, Nigeria, Belgium, Togo, Zimbabwe, Sri Lanka, United Kingdom, Malawi, Costa Rica, Cameroon, Morocco, Lesotho, Tokelau, Turkmenistan, Trinidad and Tobago, Netherlands, Iraq, Chad, Georgia, Montenegro, Mongolia, Marshall Islands, Belize, Afghanistan, Burundi, Belarus, Grenada, Greece, Andorra, Rwanda, Tajikistan, Haiti, Mexico, Saint Lucia, India, Latvia, Bhutan, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Malaysia, Norway, Czech Republic, Antigua and Barbuda, Fiji, Honduras, Mauritius, Dominican Republic, Luxembourg, Israel, San Marino, Peru, Indonesia, Vanuatu, North Macedonia, Suriname, Congo, Iceland, Cook Islands, Comoros, Colombia, Botswana, Nauru, Moldova, Sao Tome and Principe, Madagascar, Ecuador, Senegal, Maldives, Serbia, France, Lithuania, Mozambique, Zambia, Samoa, Holy See, Guatemala, Denmark, Germany, Australia, Austria, Venezuela, Iran, Palau, Kenya, Turkey, Albania, Oman, Tuvalu, Myanmar, Brunei Darussalam, Tunisia, Russia, Barbados, Brazil, Canada, Equatorial Guinea, United States of America, Qatar, Sweden, Ukraine, Guinea-Bissau, Eswatini, Tonga, Ivory Coast, Republic of Korea, Guyana, Switzerland, Cyprus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Singapore, Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Central African Republic, Poland, Kuwait, Gambia, Eritrea, Gabon, Estonia, Spain, Faroe Islands, El Salvador, Mali, Ireland, Malta, South Sudan, Sierra Leone, Panama, Bahamas, Solomon Islands, New Zealand, Monaco, Italy, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, Armenia, Micronesia, United Arab Emirates, Argentina, Sudan, Bahrain, Hungary, Papua New Guinea, Cuba, Americas, Northern America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Global, Oceania

    Ces directives sont le premier instrument détaillé, à l’échelle mondiale, relatif aux régimes fonciers et à leur administration, préparé à travers des négociations intergouvernementales. Ces directives exposent des principes et normes internationalement reconnus en vue de l’instauration de pratiques responsables pour l’utilisation et le contrôle des terres, des pêches et des forêts.

  7. Library Resource
    Voluntary Guide on the Responsible Governance of land fisheries and forests in the context of national food security
    Reports & Research
    December, 2012
    Africa, Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia, Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Sao Tome and Principe, Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Eswatini, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo, Americas, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Northern America, Canada, United States of America, Asia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Japan, Mongolia, Republic of Korea, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Iran, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Cyprus, Georgia, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Europe, Belarus, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Ukraine, Denmark, Estonia, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, Albania, Andorra, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Greece, Holy See, Italy, North Macedonia, Malta, Montenegro, Portugal, San Marino, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, Switzerland, Oceania, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Global

    The VGGT represent the first inter-governmental consensus on the principles and accepted standards for the responsible governance of tenure for governments, international organisations, communities, and the private sector. Their aim is to promote secure tenure rights and equitable access to land, fisheries and forests as a means of eradicating hunger and poverty, supporting sustainable development and enhancing the environment.The Guidelines serve as a reference and set out principles and internationally accepted standards for practices for the responsible governance of tenure.

  8. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    October, 2012
    Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia

    Large-scale land acquisitions by investors, which are often called ‘land grabs’ (see next section for de nition), can deprive rural women and communities of their livelihoods and land, increasing their food insecurity. This report argues that the current rise in land grabbing needs to be urgently addressed, and focuses
    on the actions that developing countries can take to mitigate land grabs through strengthening national land governance so that it is transparent, is accountable and protects communities’ rights.

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