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Showing items 1 through 9 of 63.
  1. Library Resource
    January, 2016
    Algeria, Ethiopia

    Population growth leads to growing land scarcity and landlessness in poor agrarian economies. Many of these also face severe climate risks that may increase in the future. Tenure security is important for food security in such countries and at the same time threatened by social instability that further accelerate rural-urban and international migration. Provision of secure property rights with low-cost methods that create investment incentives can lead to land use intensification and improved food security.

  2. Library Resource
    January, 2005
    Ukraine, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Moldova, Belarus, South Africa, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tanzania, Kazakhstan, Armenia, Brazil, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean

    This brief explores the reform of land tenure institutions which re-emerged in the 1990s, and asks if these reforms are any more gender sensitive than those of the past?The paper highlights that a focus of the recent reforms has been on land titling, designed to promote security of tenure and stimulate land markets. The reforms have often been driven by domestic and external neoliberal coalitions, with funding from global and regional organisations which have argued that private property rights are essential for a dynamic agricultural sector.

  3. Library Resource
    January, 2009
    Sub-Saharan Africa

    Over 2008 large-scale acquisitions of farmland in Africa, Latin America, Central Asia and Southeast Asia have increased. This report discusses key trends and drivers in land acquisitions, the contractual arrangements underpinning them and the way these are negotiated. It also analyses the early impacts on land access for rural people in recipient countries with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. Library Resource
    January, 2008
    Ethiopia, Sub-Saharan Africa

    There is a common view and belief that women are the ones that do the farming in Africa while the men do not work much. This paper seeks to find explanations to why land productivity is lower on land rented out by female landlord households than on land rented out by male landlord households in the Ethiopian highlands. The authors find that female landlords have tenants who are older, own less oxen, are more related, and under longer-term contracts.

  5. Library Resource
    January, 2004
    Sub-Saharan Africa

    This document summarises the proceedings from a conference organised by International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) , Natural Resource insitute (NRI) and the Royal African Society in November 2004.The conference brought together a wide range of interest groups including, African policy makers, academics and civil society representatives, as well as representatives of the private sector and international agencies, to debate the way ahead for land rights and land reforms in Africa.

  6. Library Resource
    January, 2002
    Ethiopia, Sub-Saharan Africa

    The report is based on information collected in the aftermath of the 1999 famine. It presents some basic information on North Wälo, as well as relevant impressions from the authors journey. Statistics from the Disaster Prevention and Preparedness Commission show that all of North Wälo is exposed to famine, but the picture varies much from year to year.

  7. Library Resource
    January, 2008

    This bi-annual addition of id21 Natural Resources Highlights looks specifically at rural livelihoods. It contains the following three articles:

    New thinking needed to tackle the rural employment crisis

    A further 106 million people will have joined the rural labour force in the developing world by 2015. This article asks whether enough jobs can be created in rural areas to meet this demand, or whether further urban migration is the only answer.

    How can small-scale producers compete globally?

  8. Library Resource
    January, 2013

    DFID are looking to propose that the UK supports a package of measures to strengthen land transparency and ultimately governance. This work is of a high priority for DFID and the wider UK Government. Following further research on the evidence and internal discussions, DFID have identified a gap relating to two specific questions:

    1.    What are the impacts of large-scale land acquisitions (LSA) on local food insecurity and malnutrition levels? 
    2.    Is there a difference in impacts whether investments are international or local? 

  9. Library Resource
    January, 1999
    India, Europe, Southern Asia

    Examines—from the perspective of transaction costs—factors that constrain access to land for the rural poor and other socially excluded groups in India. They find that: Land reform has reduced large landholdings since the 1950s. Medium-size farms have gained most. Formidable obstacles still prevent the poor from gaining access to land. The complexity of land revenue administration in Orissa is partly the legacy of distinctly different systems, which produced more or less complete and accurate land records.

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