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Showing items 1 through 9 of 4.
  1. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    June, 2012
    Ethiopia

    Although early attempts at land titling
    in Africa were often unsuccessful, the need to secure rights
    in view of increased demand for land, options for
    registration of a continuum of individual or communal rights
    under new laws, and the scope for reducing costs by
    combining information technology with participatory methods
    have led to renewed interest. This paper uses a
    difference-in-difference approach to assess economic impacts

  2. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    January, 2014
    Northern America

    Food First Backgrounder, Spring 2014, Vol. 20, No. 1

    Introduction: Land, Race and the Agrarian Crisis

    The disastrous effects of widespread land grabbing and land concentration sweeping the globe do not affect all farmers equally. The degree of vulnerability to these threats is highest for smallholders, women and people of color—the ones who grow, harvest, process and prepare most of the world’s food.

  3. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    January, 2014
    Latin America and the Caribbean

    Indigenous farmer in the municipality of Sayaxché, department of Petén, Guatemala, viewing the stunted corn crop on his land bordering an oil palm plantation. 

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  4. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    January, 2014
    Central African Republic

    Most analyses of violence in Darfur ignore the local dimension of the crisis, focusing instead on the region’s economic and political marginalization and climatic variability. However, agricultural change and other changes relating to the land-rights and land-use systems have led to competition and exclusion, and have played a major role in the collective violence that has raged throughout the region. Understanding these questions is essential for the successful resolution of political and policy debates in Darfur.

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