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Showing items 1 through 9 of 9.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2007

    The combination of rice and fish production into one system is considered to be an efficient means of agricultural land use for small-scale farmers. In some of these so-called rice-fish systems rice and fish are grown in the same field, at the same time; in other systems they are grown in the same field, but in rotation. Rice-fish farmers pay most attention to the maximization of the rice yield. This is a logical choice because the rice field is not the most ideal environment for fish production as the rice crop shades the field floodwater, thus hampering aquatic primary production.

  2. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2016

    This article reviews, from a socio-economic perspective, the current state of knowledge and controversies around the causes and consequences of global climate change. It considers the prospects for reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) which, according to the scientific consensus, are the key anthropogenic drivers of climate change. The focus is on two major areas of economic activity, the agriculture, forestry and other land use sector and the energy sector, which together account for around 60% of global GHG emissions.

  3. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2001

    This chapter spells out the theoretical framework for the discussion and case studies of the book. First, it provides precise definitions of technological change and classify technological change into different types based on their factor intensities. The discussion starts off with a single farm household. Two key concepts for understanding how that household will respond to technological changes are economic incentives and constraints. The former relates to how new technologies influence the economic return of different activities.

  4. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2001

    This final chapter of the book offers a set of policy recommendations. It presents some typical win-win outcomes, including technologies suited for forest poor areas, labour intensive technologies promoting intensification to replace land extensive farming practices, and promoting agricultural systems that provide environmental services similar to those of natural forests.

  5. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2001

    This introductory chapter sets the scene for the discussion in the edited volume on how new agricultural affects tropical forests. It critically reviews four hypotheses that have been central in the claim that better technologies help protect forests: the Borlaug, the subsistence, the economic development and the land degradation-deforestation hypotheses. Each of them appears to be valid only under certain restrictive conditions. The chapter then gives the aims and scope of the book, the key conclusions, as well as a summary of each of the chapters.

  6. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2007

    At independence in 1960, Africa was a modest food exporter while Asia was engulfed in a food crisis. The Green Revolution boosted food production in Asia and the global food problem shifted to Africa. However, science and technology have been promoted on an ad hoc basis in Africa's 45 years of independence. This chapter analyses why the Asian Green Revolution failed to take root in Africa, and why the average African grain yield has been flat since 1960.

  7. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2001

    Do improvements in agricultural technology protect or endanger tropical forests? This book examines this controversial issue. It includes both theoretical frameworks for analysing the issue as well as case studies covering a wide range of geographical regions, technologies, market conditions and types of agricultural procedures. The authors identify technologies, contexts and policies that are likely to be beneficial to both farmers and forests.

  8. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2001

    This chapter summarises the key insights from the case studies included in the book. First, it discusses the technology-deforestation link in six different types of cases: developed countries, commodity booms, shifting cultivation, permanent upland (rainfed) agriculture, irrigated (lowland) agriculture, and cattle production. Next, it returns to the hypotheses presented in the book, and discusses the key conditioning factors in the technology-deforestation link. A number of factors determine the outcome.

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