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Through our robust search engine, you can search for any item of the over 50,000 highly curated resources in the Land Library. 

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Showing items 1 through 9 of 10.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2016
    Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, China

    After reviewing the main causes and effects of land degradation and erosion in the uplands of mainland Southeast Asia, this chapter presents several case studies of recent land-use changes governed by economic, political and institutional transitions, the expansion of teak and rubber tree plantations in northern Laos and southwest China, respectively, and of monocropping coffee in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam. We explain how these environmental disturbances are altering water and soil resources across different geographic scales, from the agricultural plot to the headwater catchment.

  2. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    July, 2016
    China

    This study elicits the risk preferences of rural households through a field experiment conducted in Shaanxi Province using the Holt-Laury mechanism that considers the effects of implementing the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) on the risk preferences of farmers. The program has significantly changed the structure of farmers' productive property, which may further influence their risk attitudes. This study reveals that household geographic and demographic characteristics have a significant effect on the risk preferences of participants in the experiment.

  3. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    December, 2018
    Algeria, Philippines, South Africa, Japan, Chile, Peru, Italy, Ecuador, China, Tunisia, Argentina

    For centuries, farmers, herders, fishers and foresters have developed diverse and locally adapted agricultural systems managed with time tested, ingenious techniques. These practices have resulted in a vital combination of social, cultural, ecological and economic services to humankind. “Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems” (GIAHS) are outstanding landscapes of aesthetic beauty that combine agricultural biodiversity, resilient ecosystems and a valuable cultural heritage.

  4. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    September, 2018
    Kenya, Bangladesh, Mauritania, Chile, Madagascar, China, Sri Lanka, Ecuador, Argentina

    Durante siglos, los agricultores, pastores, pescadores y silvicultores han desarrollado sistemas agrícolas diversos y adaptados localmente, y los han gestionado con técnicas y prácticas ingeniosas que han perfeccionado con el paso de los años. Han sido los responsables de aportar a la humanidad una combinación esencial de servicios sociales, culturales, ecológicos y económicos.

  5. Library Resource
    Conference Papers & Reports
    February, 1999
    Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Eastern Asia, Oceania

    James D. Wolfensohn, President of the World Bank Group, discussed what the Bank learned in coming to look at the issues of poverty and development. Development requires proper economic policies, but also the essential element of the social aspects and human aspects of society. The Bank’s focus is to think first in terms of poverty—fighting poverty with passion was adopted recently as the first line of our mission statement. Wolfensohn discussed an agenda for action on the issues of inclusion, corruption, transparency, education, knowledge, and private sector environment.

  6. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    February, 2008
    Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Vietnam

    AFA Field Visits and Farmer Interactions 2006-2007

    Learning good practices in land reform, organic agriculture and pro-small farmer marketing and trading.

  7. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    December, 2003
    Eastern Africa, Eastern Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Asia, Africa, China, India, Ethiopia
  8. Library Resource
    International Conventions or Treaties
    January, 1979
    Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, North Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Eswatini, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) - currently ratified by 187 countries - is the only human rights treaty that deals specifically with rural women (Art. 14). Adopted in 1979 by the United Nations Generally Assembly, entered into force in 1981. The Convention defines discrimination against women as follows:

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