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Showing items 1 through 9 of 33.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2003
    Vietnam

    The process of decollectivization in Vietnam, leading up to the 1993 Land Law, ensured farming households the rights to market their own produce and to transfer, exchange, lease, inherit, and mortgage their land-use rights. These changes imply a reworking of relations between state, market, and household, but also within households. Although the allocation of agricultural land in northern Vietnam was relatively equitable, allocation by the state represents only one channel of entitlements to land.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2011
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Vietnam

    ABSTRACTED FROM INTRODUCTION: Women’s access to and control over land can potentially lead to gender equality alongside addressing material deprivation. Land is not just a productive asset and a source of material wealth, but equally a source of security, status and recognition. Substantive gender equality is both relational and multi-dimensional, cutting across race, class, caste, age, educational and locational hierarchies and can only be achieved if rights are seen as socially legitimate.

  3. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2017
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    Women's empowerment is considered a ‘prerequisite’ to achieving global food security. Gender systems, however, are diverse and complex. The nature and extent of gender inequity and the conditions necessary to empower women vary across countries, communities and regions. The study of different gender systems is thus fundamental to capture cross-cultural variations in gender specific needs and constraints to effectively address gender gaps.

  4. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2019
    Vietnam

    Since Vietnam shifted to a market-economy in the 1980s, Hanoi has seen rapid urban expansion similar to that of other South East Asian cities - involving megaprojects, luxury developments, rural-to-urban migration, informal housing construction, and escalating speculation. Researchers have considered how unemployment and the disruption of community life followed the urbanization of rural areas. However, little has been said about how people adjusted their everyday life to cope with the changes.

  5. Library Resource

    Volume 8 Issue 10

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2019
    Vietnam

    Since the 2000s, agricultural land acquisition (ALA) for urbanization and industrialization has been quickly implemented in Vietnam, which has led to a huge socioeconomic transformation in rural areas. This paper applies the sustainable livelihoods framework to analyze how ALA has impacted the socioeconomic status (SES) of rural women whose agricultural land was acquired. To get primary data, we surveyed 150 affected households, conducted three group discussions and interviewed nine key informants.

  6. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    March, 2018
    Bangladesh, Nigeria, Peru, Ghana, Ethiopia, Niger, Malawi, Honduras, Uganda, Tanzania, Ecuador, Cambodia, Paraguay, Burkina Faso, Iraq, Burundi, Nepal, Nicaragua, Tajikistan, Haiti, Mexico, Vietnam

    For rural women and men, land is often the most important household asset for supporting agricultural production and providing food security and nutrition. Evidence shows that secure land tenure is strongly associated with higher levels of investment and productivity in agriculture – and therefore with higher incomes and greater economic wellbeing. Secure land rights for women are often correlated with better outcomes for them and their families, including greater bargaining power at household and community levels, better child nutrition and lower levels of gender-based violence.

  7. Library Resource

    Evidence from 33 Countries

    Reports & Research
    March, 2019
    Morocco, Tunisia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Cameroon, Namibia, Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Costa Rica, Honduras, Mexico, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Jordan, United Kingdom

    This report uses household-level data from 33, mostly developing, countries to analyse perceptions of tenure insecurity among women. We test two hypotheses: (1) that women feel more insecure than men; and (2) that increasing statutory protections for women, for instance by issuing joint named titles or making inheritance law more gender equal, increases de facto tenure security.

  8. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2013
    Vietnam

    Rural and livelihood studies, alongside development organisations, are stressing the importance of gender awareness in debates over food security, food crises and land tenure. Yet, within the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, these gender dynamics are frequently disregarded. In Vietnam, rice is intimately linked to the country’s food security. Over the last decade, rice export levels, production methods, and local and global market prices have remained constant preoccupations for governmental and development agencies.

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