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Showing items 1 through 9 of 6.
  1. Library Resource
    REwebinarreport_coverphoto
    Reports & Research
    January, 2020
    Ethiopia, Uganda, Peru, Indonesia

    Evidence shows that women can benefit from having individualised land rights formalized in their names. However, similar evidence is not available for formalization of land rights that are based on collective tenure. Studies have estimated that as much as 65 percent of the world’s land is held under customary, collective-tenure systems. Improving tenure security for land held collectively has been shown to improve resource management and to support self-determination of indigenous groups.

  2. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    November, 2018
    Serbia, Nepal, Morocco, Guatemala, Philippines, Uganda, Albania, Oman, Peru, Azerbaijan, Indonesia, Zimbabwe, Colombia, Cambodia, Congo, Argentina, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, China, Mexico, Kenya

    Goal 5 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) “Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls” recognizes the fundamental role of women in achieving poverty reduction, food security and nutrition.

  3. Library Resource
    Training Resources & Tools
    January, 2014
    Sub-Saharan Africa, Kenya, Madagascar, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, South Africa, Ghana

    Land is a vital resource that sustains livelihoods across Sub-Saharan Africa, but also one that is heavily prone to corruption. Every second citizen in Africa has been affected by land corruption in recent years, according to a study by Transparency International.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    November, 2012
    Uganda, Africa

    Examines the literature on Uganda’s tenure systems, including the legal and administrative frameworks and their implementation at the local level, analyses the relations between these elements and tenure security and discusses ways in which land may relate to economic activities. Implementation of reforms has been slow and partial. The literature shows that the division of labour between land administration institutions at the different administrative levels is not clearly spelled out and that they are often inaccessible at the local level.

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