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Showing items 1 through 9 of 34.
  1. Library Resource
    Conference Papers & Reports
    April, 1988
    Africa

    The scale and persistence of the food crisis in Africa during the last

    20 years is of the gravest concern to African governments as well as to the international community. Food production is not able to keep pace with population growth and many countries in the continent have become increasingly dependent on imports of food stuffs originating from international aid.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    October, 2002
    Slovenia, Liechtenstein, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Poland, Germany, Australia, Czech Republic, Switzerland, Eastern Europe

    Women's employment in transition countries, notably Central and Eastern Europe has become increasingly informal and flexible. The first growing trend is that women are more involved in cross-border trade, known as 'suitcase' trade, often keeping women away from home for days or months. They buy mainly consumer and household goods usually unavailable in their home countries, to sell to street vendors on their return home. The second growing trend is women's involvement in sub-contracting, particularly work such as hand sewing for the textile and shoe industries.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    August, 2001
    Mozambique, Egypt, Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda, Mali, Somalia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Western Asia, Western Africa, Global, Eastern Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa

    Trade liberalisation processes impact differently on men and women due to the fact that men and women have different roles in production. Despite the fact that women are actively involved in international trade, WTO agreements are gender blind and as such have adverse impacts on women. The General Agreement in Trade and Service (GATS), for instance, provides for a level playing field in service provision between big foreign owned companies and small locally owned companies.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    February, 2003
    Indonesia, Philippines, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

    How does the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Agreement on Agriculture (AOA) affect the livelihoods of rural women in Asia? This paper, prepared on the occasion of the WTO-AOA review in 2003, analyzes the impact of the new trading rules imposed by the WTO on Asian peasants. It illustrates the inherent imbalances in the WTO-AOA's trade liberalisation policies which, among other things, flood local markets with highly subsidized agricultural imports from developed countries to the detriment of domestic agriculture.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2003
    Eastern Asia

    This economic literacy pack, the third in this series, is a tool for educating local women's constituencies on trade rules and negotiations. It explores four main themes, firstly 'How the WTO Treats National Health Emergencies in the Rubric of Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS)'. This section demonstrates how the agreement protects the patent interests of private pharmaceutical firms based in developed countries, while jeopardizing the public health of the poor in developing countries.

  6. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2008
    Global

    Because of their lower social and economic status, as well as physiological needs, women are often more vulnerable to nutritional problems. When it comes to sharing food resources in the home, women and girls can lose out. Indeed, the full realisation of the right to food for women depends on parallel achievements in the right to health, education, access to information and access to resources such as land.

  7. Library Resource
    Training Resources & Tools
    June, 2004
    Global

    Women's access to land is a fundamental factor in food security. Yet women all over the world suffer under discriminatory property and inheritance laws and customary practices which restrict their rights over the land on which they live and work. Articles 15 and 16 of CEDAW state the rights of women to property and inheritance. This report is a tool to help non-governmental organisations and multilateral agencies in advocacy and policy dialogue using CEDAW and the Optional Protocol (which allows individuals and groups to make complaints directly to the CEDAW committee).

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