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Showing items 1 through 9 of 206.
  1. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    April, 2020
    Africa, South America, Central America, Asia

    Landscape governance refers to the combination of rules and decision-making processes of civic, private, and public actors with stakes in the landscape, that together shape the future of that landscape. As part of the Green Livelihoods Alliance, a program that supports civil society organizations (CSOs) to strengthen the governance of tropical forested landscapes, we developed and implemented a method that facilitates stakeholders to assess the status of governance in their own landscape and to identify options for improvement.

  2. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    April, 2020
    Costa Rica

    Land acquisition often involves power and displacement and can be carried out on a large scale. There are many forms of land acquisition, including for environmental and conservation purposes as well as for production activities. While green grabbing has joined land grabbing as an environmental justice issue of concern, it is not necessarily the case that all green land acquisition is large scale, done by powerful outsiders, or leads to displacement and exclusion.

  3. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    April, 2020
    Indonesia

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of slum development, community poverty, and community behavior on environmental degradation in the Tallo river basin in Makassar City and to analyze the effects of natural resource conservation, economic empowerment, community capacity building on the productivity of economic enterprises and ecosystem-based sustainability. This study uses a qualitative-quantitative approach in sequence. Data were obtained through observation, surveys, and documentation.

  4. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    April, 2020
    Global

    Land related inequality is a central component of the wider inequality that is one of the burning issues of our society today. It affects us all and directly determines the quality of life for billions of people who depend on land and related resources for their livelihoods. This paper explores land inequality based on a wide scoping of available information and identifies the main trends and their drivers. A wider conceptualization of what constitutes land inequality is suggested in response to shifts in how power is concentrated within the agri-food system.

  5. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    April, 2020
    Spain

    The sustainability of territories (e.g., regions and countries) is currently an issue that should be considered when implementing organizational strategies. The globalization, industrialization, and population growth trends observed in recent decades have forced experts to adopt a sustainable approach capable of guaranteeing that a population’s present needs can be met without compromising future generations’ well-being. Among the essential pillars of successful sustainability strategies, social development stands out as quite important, so the present study focused on it.

  6. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    April, 2020
    Ethiopia

    The fast-paced urbanization of recent decades entails that many regions are facing seemingly uncontrolled land-use changes (LUCs) that go hand in hand with a range of environmental and socio-economic challenges. In this paper, we use an integrated cellular automata–Markov chain (CA–MC) model to analyze and predict the urban expansion of and its impact on LUC in the city of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. To this end, the research marshals high-resolution Landsat images of 1991, 2002, 2011, and 2018.

  7. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    April, 2020
    Global

    The urban area is characterized by different urban ecosystems that interact with different institutional levels, including different stakeholders and decision-makers, such as public administrations and governments. This can create many institutional conflicts in planning and designing the urban space. It would arguably be ideal for an urban area to be planned like a socio-ecological system where the urban ecosystem and institutional levels interact with each other in a multi-scale analysis.

  8. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 3

    Peer-reviewed publication
    March, 2020
    Sub-Saharan Africa

    Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) failed to meet most Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) require knowledge-intensive actions that weigh development goals against sustainability options with several possibilities in various contexts. Land resources are the mainstay for most African communities and the basis of achievement of most SDGs. The “transformation imperative” in Africa will only take place in a differentiated set of resource management and use. The baselines in African countries are rather low in terms of internal policy and economic functions.

  9. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 3

    Peer-reviewed publication
    March, 2020
    Thailand

    Since 2016, the Thai Government has pursued a twenty-year national economic growth policy, Thailand 4.0, promoting innovation and stimulating international investment through the Eastern Economic Corridor (EEC) project. The EEC project involves significant land acquisition resulting in the need to relocate villagers with potential impact on food security in a major food production area.

  10. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 3

    Peer-reviewed publication
    March, 2020
    China

    A new urbanization and rural revitalization strategy has been implemented in China over a number of years, under which farmers’ land contract rights (LCRs) flow inevitably through various means. The practice in reform pilot areas indicates that government funds cannot meet all the needs, so exploring market-based LCR payout paths is important for rural land tenure system reform. The purpose of this study is to answer questions such as the following: How would farmers respond if they were allowed to trade LCRs? Is there an equilibrium point between the potential supply and demand of LCRs?

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