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Showing items 1 through 9 of 77.
  1. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 1998
    Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Global, Central Asia, Southern Asia

    Do women work more or less when countries trade more? Do trade expansion and economic liberalisation affect women and men in different ways'? Case studies from Ghana, Uganda, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Jamaica are used in this report to illustrate some of the gender dimensions relating to trade. Present evidence suggests that, under certain conditions, export expansion can benefit certain groups of younger, more educated women. However in general, the rights of women workers to fair terms and conditions of employment need protection.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    October, 2002
    Slovenia, Liechtenstein, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Poland, Germany, Australia, Czech Republic, Switzerland, Eastern Europe

    Women's employment in transition countries, notably Central and Eastern Europe has become increasingly informal and flexible. The first growing trend is that women are more involved in cross-border trade, known as 'suitcase' trade, often keeping women away from home for days or months. They buy mainly consumer and household goods usually unavailable in their home countries, to sell to street vendors on their return home. The second growing trend is women's involvement in sub-contracting, particularly work such as hand sewing for the textile and shoe industries.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    October, 1997
    Global

    How would environmentally sustainable development look if it was gender-sensitive? This report argues that much mainstream literature on environmentally sustainable development has ignored the gender dimensions. Where women have been the target of programmes, they have been seen as natural managers of environmental resources. A gender analysis is important because gender relations affect the ways in which poor men and women manage natural resources.

  4. Library Resource
    January, 2014
    Tanzania, Kenya, Morocco, Benin, Tunisia

    The Integrated Drylands Development Programme (IDDP) is a global UNDP initiative to promote sustainable development in the drylands, and advance the implementation of the UN Convention to Combat Desertification. This topic brief highlights the important role that gender plays in this context of sustainable development, in particular the role of women in the Arab States and Africa. In these regions, inequality and stereotypical gender norms often prevent women from contributing to the sustainable development of drylands, despite possessing a wealth of traditional knowledge and skills.

  5. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    January, 2002
    Peru, Central America, Caribbean, South America

    What is the condition of women in Peru? This gender profile by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) offers a statistical overview of the condition of urban and rural women with respect to unemployment, status in the workplace, life expectancy and working and living conditions. Poverty is an ongoing concern and half the population continues to subsist below the poverty line. Rural women suffer the most with lower rates of literacy and fewer employment opportunities than urban women and men in general.

  6. Library Resource
    Training Resources & Tools
    June, 1999

    A checklist for gender-sensitive analysis of land tenure and common property resource systems, with sections on: gender roles, needs, incentives and benefits; project planning; livelihoods context; facilitating participation; and measuring impact.

  7. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    June, 1999

    Gender issues in land tenure systems. Sections include: key issues; females' less visible roles; instances when women and girls may need special attention; examples of gender sensitive terms of reference; and mini case studies.

  8. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    April, 2003
    Burkina Faso, Tunisia, Senegal, Western Africa, Western Asia, Northern Africa

    Women do 70 per cent of the agricultural work in Senegal, but according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), own only two percent of the land that may be cultivated. Although property laws in countries such as Senegal, Tunisia and Burkina Faso recognise women' s and men's equal rights, and Islam gives women the right to inherit half what men inherit, in practice men retain land ownership. Women are dependent on fathers or husbands for land.

  9. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2006
    Malawi, Southern Africa, Eastern Africa

    Malawi is facing increasing land scarcity and food insecurity for its large rural population and is in the midst of an on-going land policy reform process. This report asks how these reforms may affect women's land rights in a situation of increasing scarcity and competition for land. Reforms include the formalisation of customary land rights as private land rights as a way to ensure tenure security and equitable access to land. It warns that through this approach, women's rights may become increasingly marginalised.

  10. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    March, 1997
    Oceania

    How are family gender relations affected by extra-household conditions in South Asia' By investigating quantitative factors (e.g. land ownership and income), along with qualitative aspects (e.g. social perceptions, interaction of gender relations in market, community, state and household), this paper shows how these multiple conditions influence the relative bargaining power of different household members. It argues that such understanding is vital for designing policy interventions. Control over land and income increases an individual's bargaining power.

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