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Showing items 1 through 9 of 31.
  1. Library Resource
    January, 2007

    The current debate on climate change, its impacts on socio-ecological systems and the role of agriculture has shifted from an emphasis on how to mitigate the effects of increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to how to prepare and adapt to the expected adverse impacts. This follows the recognition that the climate is already changing as a result of mankind’s activities and there is little that can be done to prevent further increases in atmospheric concentrations of GHG in the short term.

  2. Library Resource
    January, 2006
    Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, Western Asia, Northern America, Northern Africa, Eastern Asia, Oceania, Southern Asia

    This report highlights the potentially significant impacts on the hydrologic cycle and the importance of considering secondary effects, particularly with regard to water, resulting from the widespread adoption of global climate change mitigation measures. It is recommended that the implicit hydrologic dimensions of climate change mitigation should be more formally articulated within the international environmental conventions, and recognized within future UNFCCC negotiations on the CDM-AR provisions.

  3. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2006
    China, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, South-Eastern Asia

    Recurring water crises, global water initiatives, and demands for water reforms by development banks, have all pushed water up the agenda of most Mekong-region countries. Many changes have already been made. Now decision makers need to know what has worked, what hasn?t, and why. To find out, IWMI has reviewed new water policies, plans and laws, and assessed participation, the new water ?apex bodies?, and integrated water resources management (IWRM). The findings show that top-down state policies based on ?blueprints?

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2006

    This research report presents the findings of the first phase of the action-research project "Models for implementing multiple-use water supply systems for enhanced land and water productivity, rural livelihoods and gender equity." Multipleuse water services, or "mus" in short, is a participatory, integrated and poverty-reduction focused approach in poor rural and peri-urban areas, which takes people's multiple water needs as a starting point for providing integrated services, moving beyond the conventional sectoral barriers of the domestic and productive sectors.

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