Search results | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

Land Library Search

Through our robust search engine, you can search for any item of the over 50,000 highly curated resources in the Land Library. 

If you would like to find an overview of what is possible, feel free to peruse the Search Guide


Search results

Showing items 1 through 9 of 22.
  1. Library Resource
    January, 2008

    This sourcebook is intended as a ready reference for practitioners (including World Bank stakeholders and clients in borrowing countries as well as Bank project leaders) seeking information on the state of the art about good land management approaches and innovations for investments, and close monitoring for potential scaling up.

    Originally Published In: World Bank, Agriculture and Rural Development Department (2008)

     

  2. Library Resource
    January, 2008

    Following from the Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture project, this book examines the relationships and linkages between land use and water management and social systems. Given that agriculture is the largest economic sector in many developing countries, this volume provides innovative ideas for the prevention of land degradation and for improving the sustainability of food production in the developing world.

  3. Library Resource
    January, 2007

    The current debate on climate change, its impacts on socio-ecological systems and the role of agriculture has shifted from an emphasis on how to mitigate the effects of increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to how to prepare and adapt to the expected adverse impacts. This follows the recognition that the climate is already changing as a result of mankind’s activities and there is little that can be done to prevent further increases in atmospheric concentrations of GHG in the short term.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2007
    Vietnam, South-Eastern Asia

    This report identifies the driving forces for reforestation in three villages of Northern Vietnam. Using an institutional analysis focused on the rules governing upland access and use, the authors assess the relative impact of state policies (reforestation programs and forestland allocation) on land use change. Findings show that the latter are indirectly responsible for reforestation, but not because of the incentives they provided. Instead, they disrupted the local rules governing annual crop cultivation and grazing activities leading to the end of annual cropping.

Share this page