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Showing items 1 through 9 of 26.
  1. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    September, 2013
    South-Eastern Asia, Bangladesh

    Research was conducted in Alutilla Valley in eastern Bangladesh to identify the nature of existing agroforestry systems and to identify potential agroforestry models that could ameliorate currently degrading forest resources Data were collected through farmer participatory research and a structured quarterly survey in two villages. Qualitative and supplementary quantitative analysis methods were used to assess the financial potential of agroforestry systems.

  2. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2015
    South-Eastern Asia, Indonesia

    The deforestation-free movement (or “zero-deforestation”) has emerged recently in a context of lower state control, globalization and pressure on corporations by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) through consumer awareness campaigns, acknowledging the essential role of agricultural commodities in deforestation. It takes the form of commitments by corporations to ensure that the products they either produce, process, trade or retail are not linked to forest conversion.

  3. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    January, 2018
    Global

    This collection of 12 stories from women and men in nine countries in different parts of Africa shines a light on the efforts of communities, some of them decades-long, in restoring degraded forests and landscapes. The stories are not generated through any rigorous scientific process, but are nonetheless illustrative of the opportunities communities create as they solve their own problems, and of the many entry points we have for supporting and accelerating community effort.

  4. Library Resource
    January, 2009
    Cameroon

    In developing countries, forest management, sharing and collaboration has encountered major problems as reflected in Southern Cameroon’s forested landscape, which is challenged by differences in power, knowledge gaps, and competing land rights claims. The authors use Cameroon’s forests, as an integral part of research on adaptive collaborative management (ACM) across three continents.

  5. Library Resource
    January, 2014
    Indonesia, Tanzania, Brazil, Vietnam, Cameroon, Peru

    Since 2007, it has been hoped that REDD+ would deliver on the 3E+ criteria (effectiveness, efficiency, equity, social and environmental co?benefits) for strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This report highlights that the early enthusiasm for REDD+ has dissipated among some stakeholders – this is largely attributed to the failure to attain an international climate change agreement.

  6. Library Resource
    The Scramble for Land Rights cover image

    Reducing Inequity between Communities and Companies

    Reports & Research
    July, 2018
    Global

    Increasing global demand for natural resources is intensifying competition for land across the developing world, pushing companies onto territories that many Indigenous Peoples and rural communities have sustainably managed for generations.

  7. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2017
    Global

    Recognition and respect for tenure rights has long been recognized as an important concern for development, conservation, and natural resource governance. This paper discusses why secure tenure rights for local communities, indigenous peoples and women are central to good natural resource governance and important for livelihoods and human rights, as recognized in multiple international conventions. The paper reviews both challenges and opportunities for securing rights in practice and highlights successful cases of tenure reform.

  8. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    May, 2017
    Africa

    Peru has formalized property rights for 1,200 indigenous communities in the Amazon. These titled indigenous lands cover over 11 million hectares and represent approximately 17% of the national forest area. Progress has been possible due to multiple reforms that recognized indigenous rights to collective lands, a process characterized by complex and protracted conflicts among competing interests, shifting government priorities and continued resistance by indigenous people to contest efforts that undercut their interests.

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