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Showing items 1 through 9 of 8.
  1. Library Resource
    January, 2013
    India, Kenya, China

    Through the analysis of newspaper articles and a survey of journalists, this publication identifies gaps and highlights differences in how the media portray pastoralism in Kenya, China and India. In discussing their methodology, the authors note that their reliance on national, English-language publications meant that they were not able to include data from vernacular language press in pastoral regions.Although able to make significant contributions to food security, livelihoods and economic prosperity, the benefits of pastoralism often go unnoticed.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    October, 2006
    Africa

    Main chapters cover access to land and poverty reduction, land redistribution, and securing land rights. The last includes the role of land markets, women’s land rights, securing local resource rights in foreign investment projects, protecting the rights of indigenous peoples and pastoralists, conflicts.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    July, 2010
    Africa

    Includes land alienation in the case study sites; impacts of land alienation; coping strategies; conclusions and policy recommendations. Found that livestock numbers are declining dramatically in the area, land degradation is increasing, people are becoming more vulnerable to drought and famine, and resource-based conflicts are increasing in severity. The traditional pastoralist way of life is increasingly making way for sedentary farming and enclosed private grazing land.

  4. Library Resource
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    Reports & Research
    June, 2017
    Niger

    Date: juin 2017

    Source: Foncier & Développement

    Par: Serge Aubague, Nasser Sani Baaré 

    Le Niger est probablement le pays sahélien disposant du corpus juridique et du dispositif institutionnel le plus élaboré pour prémunir les pasteurs contre l’accaparement des terres pastorales. Ceci ne suffit hélas pas à endiguer le phénomène.

  5. Library Resource
    Cover photo
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    September, 2013
    Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia

    Large-scale land acquisitions are increasing in pace and scale, in particular across parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Weak governance and poor land use planning mean that commercial ‘land grabs’ often damage biodiversity as well as dispossessing people from customary rights and livelihoods. Land can also be ‘grabbed’ for ‘green’ purposes, triggering conflicts that undermine potential synergies. Expanded state protected areas, land for carbon offset markets and REDD, and for private conservation projects all potentially conflict with community rights.

  6. Library Resource
    Cover photo
    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2010
    Tanzania

    This paper presents several case studies to show how the Ujamaa Community Resource Team (UCRT) has been working within Tanzania’s legal and policy framework to support a diverse range of pastoralists, agro-pastoralists and hunter-gatherers, all of whom face fundamental threats from external appropriation of, or encroachment on, lands and natural resources. The work also responds to local needs to rationalise resource use rights amongst competing local groups, such as farmers and livestock keepers.

  7. Library Resource

    Accompanying change within Borana pastoral systems.

    Reports & Research
    January, 2003
    Ethiopia

    Forests and pastoralism are in a state of crisis in the Borana lowlands in southern Ethiopia. State management has failed to control forest exploitation and past and present development interventions continue to undermine pastoral production systems. In this paper the authors aim to show how a fundamental misunderstanding of pastoral land management, and in particular pastoral tenure systems, has undermined traditional institutions and the environment for which they were once responsible.

  8. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2008
    Tanzania

    The Pastoral Women’s Council (PWC) is a community-based organisation established in 1997 in Tanzania. It was founded to promote the development of Maasai pastoralist women and children by facilitating their access to education, health, social services and economic empowerment. It seeks to address women’s marginalisation in patriarchal Maasai culture, as well as the poverty among the Maasai that has long been underpinned by land access restrictions for pastoralists, hunters and gatherers.

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