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Showing items 1 through 9 of 19.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2011
    Germany

    This article examines the origins of the natural-wine movement in Germany—the first of its kind in Europe—by exploring the crucial technological and social developments which prompted the use of derided “artificial” winemaking techniques. The forgotten social reformer Ludwig Gall, once known to as the “savoir of the small vintner,” helped to relieve the unreliable dependency of winegrowers on nature by perfecting a deacidification technique which allowed for pleasant wines in any vintage.

  2. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2011
    United States of America

    The influence of social others in private landowner decision-making has received limited attention despite growing support for peer-to-peer learning and landowner cooperative behavior. We applied social network analysis (SNA), a relatively novel methodology in the context of private forestry, to evaluate the influence of landowners' social networks on their forestry management decisions and as related to current policy arrangements in Wisconsin, USA.

  3. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012
    South Africa, Southern Africa

    The advent of grid electrification in the Sandveld region of South Africa in the 1980s increased the utilisation of groundwater resources for commercial irrigation purposes. In the wake of the consequent increased pressure on the resource, it behooves landowners to use water more productively and responsibly. This paper calculated the marginal product value (MPV) of irrigation water for potatoes and vine production in this region to assess and to allow the comparison of the productivity of irrigation water with other commodities and regions.

  4. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012

    To better engage Maine's family forest landowners our study used social network analysis: a computational social science method for identifying stakeholders, evaluating models of engagement, and targeting areas for enhanced partnerships. Interviews with researchers associated with a research center were conducted to identify how social network analysis could improve knowledge transfer in the researcher–stakeholder relationship. Analysis found a large network of family forest stakeholders and organizations in Maine.

  5. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012

    In 1979 and 1980 predators were under control on sheep farms in the Ceres Karoo. At the time, a subsidised hunting club assisted landowners with predator control measures. A farm-level analysis of data from the Ceres hunting club's logbooks reveals that four out of five farms have experienced no predator damage whatsoever. For those reporting problems, the typical loss was in the region of one per cent of the estimated turnover. Lynx (caracal), leopards and feral dogs were responsible for most of the damage.

  6. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012
    Georgia

    Understanding factors that influence the supply of private acreage for lease hunting has become increasingly important to sustaining hunting. Improving on existing studies that mostly utilized landowners' responses from contingent surveys, we adopted a different approach to this question by analyzing 2009 market data from Georgia counties.

  7. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2016

    There is increasing interest in plantations with the objective of producing biomass for energy and fuel. These types of plantations are called Short Rotation Woody Crops (SRWC). Popular SRWC species are Eucalypt (Eucalyptus spp.), Cottonwood (Populus deltoides) and Willow (Salix spp.). These species have in common strong growth rates, the ability to coppice, and rotations of 2–10 years.

  8. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012

    In order for carbon credits awarded for reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation of forests (REDD) to be effective, they need to be competitive with alternative land uses. In the case of Southeast Asia, oil palm cultivation is one of the most lucrative possible land uses. Existing mechanisms for awarding certified emission reductions (CERs) might not be adequately flexible to changing commodity prices or to meet the needs of landowners who heavily discount future returns from their land.

  9. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2013
    United States of America

    The Cooperative Extension Service in the United States can play an important role in educating forest landowners to improve forest resilience in the face of climatic uncertainty. Two focus groups in Florida informed the development of a program that was conducted in Leon County; presurveys and postsurveys and observation provided evaluation data. The Reasonable Person Model (RPM) was a helpful framework for developing the program and explaining results. Landowners desired more information in order to manage their forests in light of climate change after the program than before.

  10. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2015

    Acacia koa is a valuable tree species economically, ecologically and culturally in Hawai'i. A vascular wilt disease of A. koa resulting from infection by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. koae (FOXY) causes high rates of mortality in field plantings and threatens native A. koa forests in Hawai'i. Landowners are reluctant to consider A. koa for reforestation and restoration in many areas due to the threat of FOXY. Producing seeds or propagules with genetic resistance to FOXY is vital to successful A. koa reforestation and restoration.

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