Search | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

Land Library Search

Through our robust search engine, you can search for any item of the over 50,000 highly curated resources in the Land Library. 

If you would like to find an overview of what is possible, feel free to peruse the Search Guide


Search results

Showing items 1 through 9 of 12.
  1. Library Resource
    LAND MARKET VALUES, URBAN LAND POLICIES, AND THEIR IMPACTS IN URBAN CENTERS OF RWANDA cover image
    Reports & Research
    Conference Papers & Reports
    August, 2014
    Rwanda

    The main objective of this research is to investigate land market values, urban land policies and their impacts on urban centers in Rwanda. Three (3) specific objectives can be distinguished namely: a) Evaluating the determinants of urban land markets; b) Analysis of trends in urban land markets and values; and c) Assessing impacts of urban land prices and policies.

  2. Library Resource
    Policy Brief: Land Market Values, Urban Land Policies, and their Impacts in Urban Centers of Rwanda cover image
    Conference Papers & Reports
    June, 2014
    Rwanda

    This policy brief summarizes the main findings and recommendations of qualitative and quantative research on urban land markets in Rwanda. The main objective of this research is to investigate land market values, urban land policies and their impacts on urban centers. Three (3) specific objectives can be distinguished namely: a) Evaluating the determinants of urban land markets; b) Analysis of trends in urban land markets and values; and c) Assessing impacts of urban land prices and policies.

  3. Library Resource
    Promoting Social Inclusion in Urban Areas: Policies and Practices cover image
    Reports & Research
    September, 2005
    Rwanda

    According to recent UN estimates, 924 million people - nearly one out of three urban dwellers – were living in slums in 2004. Of these, 874 million are from low and middle-income countries (Millennium Project, 2005). Urban poverty as a proportion of total poverty is clearly increasing: 43% of the population of developing cities are living in slums (28% in North Africa, 71% in sub-
    1

  4. Library Resource

    A new era of the global land rush

    Reports & Research
    September, 2016
    Australia, Global, Honduras, India, Mozambique, Peru, Sri Lanka

    Since 2009, Oxfam and others have been raising the alarm about a great global land rush. Millions of hectares of land have been acquired by investors to meet rising demand for food and biofuels, or for speculation. This often happens at the expense of those who need the land most and are best placed to protect it: farmers, pastoralists, forest-dependent people, fisherfolk, and indigenous peoples.
     

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    March, 2016
    Uganda

    The Learning Route (LR) is capacity development deliverable of the TSLI-ESA project implemented by UN-Habitat through GLTN, funded by IFAD. It aims at enhancing awareness, knowledgeand skills of staff from IFAD supported projects, programs and partners in application of geo-spatial technologies in securing land and natural resource tenure and on innovation on inclusive business models (IBMs).

  6. Library Resource
    Cover photo
    Conference Papers & Reports
    March, 2017
    Tanzania

    This preliminary study involved consultation of responsible district government officials and relevant Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) on various issues related to land and investments. Among other areas, the Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania (SAGCOT) was selected as a study site and study used the Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) to obtain information. Questionnaire designed reflected land investment  governance  process  thematic  areas.

  7. Library Resource
    Cover photo
    Conference Papers & Reports
    December, 2005
    Tanzania

    The land tenure system of Tanzania has passed through different historical milestones which form the basis for the analysis of the land tenure regime in general and tenure relations for land owners and users in particular in the past eight decades. The history dates back to 1923 when the British colonial legislative assembly enacted the Land Ordinance cap 113 to guide and regulate land use and ownership in Tanganyika which was their protectorate colony. Prior to this law, all the land in Tanzania was owned under customary tenure governed by clan and tribal traditions.

  8. Library Resource
    Cover photo

    Experience from Tanzania

    Conference Papers & Reports
    March, 2014
    Tanzania

    To ensure that there is sustainability at the community level in its land rights and governance training programme, Land Rights Research and Resources Institute (HAKIARDHI), a Tanzanian national level organization that spearheads land rights of small-scale producers, uses land rights monitors (LRMs) in its program areas. In each of the selected villages of the program districts, two LRMs (a man and a woman) who have received land rights training from HAKIARDHI are democratically elected by villagers.

  9. Library Resource
    Conference Papers & Reports
    March, 2018
    Africa, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, Namibia, Liberia, Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia

    Across Africa, Asia and Latin America, investors are increasingly approaching rural communities seeking land for logging, mining, and agribusiness ventures. Even in those situations where the investors have followed FPIC guidelines and undertaken a formal “consultation” with the community, these consultations are generally conducted in a context of significant power and information asymmetries. Part of the power imbalance comes from communities’ lack of information about the value of community lands and natural resources.

  10. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    April, 2019
    Sub-Saharan Africa, Zambia, Sierra Leone

    This report presents findings on corruption in large scale land-based investments (LSLBIs) in Sub-Saharan Africa, and although it draws on case studies from Sierra Leone and Zambia, its recommendations aim to be applicable across Sub-Saharan Africa. 

Share this page