Search results | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

Land Library Search

Through our robust search engine, you can search for any item of the over 50,000 highly curated resources in the Land Library. 

If you would like to find an overview of what is possible, feel free to peruse the Search Guide


Search results

Showing items 1 through 9 of 11.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2014
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    The type of agrarian structure employed to produce tropical commodities affects many dimensions of land use, such as ownership inequality, overlapping land rights and conflicts, and land use changes. I conduct a literature review of historical changes in agrarian structures of commodities grown on the upland frontier of mainland Southeast and South Asia, using a case study approach, of tea, rubber, oil palm and cassava.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2014
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    This briefing note presents the findings of seven case studies conducted from May to June 2014. The studies were conducted in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Nepal and Thailand and looked into the livelihood and food security among indigenous shifting cultivation communities in South and Southeast Asia. The briefing note provides a summary of the main findings of the case studies and the common recommendations from a multi-stakeholders consultation held August 28-29 in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2011
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    ABSTRACTED FROM THE SUMMARY: Land-grabbing is occurring at a significant extent and pace in Southeast Asia; some of the characteristics of this land grab differ from those in regions such as Africa. At a glance, Europe is not a high profile, major driver of land-grabbing in this region, but a closer examination reveals that it nonetheless is playing a significant role. This influence is both direct and indirect, through European corporate sector and public policies, as well as through multilateral agencies within which EU states are members.

  4. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2011
    Laos

    In recent years the Lao government has provided many foreign investors with large-scale economic land concessions to develop plantations. These concessions have resulted in significant alterations of landscapes and ecological processes, greatly reduced local access to resources through enclosing common areas, and ultimately leading to massive changes in the livelihoods of large numbers of mainly indigenous peoples living near these concessions.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2009
    Laos

    The research team set out to answer three research questions: 1) What are rubber investment’s key features with regard to the investment process, investor identity, location, activities and scale? 2) How was the “upland” landscape originally zoned and mapped as part of the LFA process, and later re-zoned and mapped by local authorities and foreign investors? 3) What are the impacts of rubber investment in upland areas on the land use and livelihoods of the villagers involved?

  6. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2005
    Laos

    According to the annual report of Huaphan Provincial Agriculture and Forestry Office (PAFO) (1999), despite land allocation, some villages are still practising shifting cultivation. To address this problem many decrees and regulations on land and land use have been developed and declared. The land allocation (LA) programme is one of these initiatives. So far, no effort has been made to evaluate whether the LA programme could facilitate change in land use and land management. The major objective of this study was to assess the impact of the LA programme on land use and land management.

  7. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2015
    Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam

    PUBLISHER'S ABSTRACT: The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 13 September 2007. Since then, the importance of the role that indigenous peoples play in economic, social and environmental conservation through traditional sustainable agricultural practices has been gradually recognized.

  8. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    December, 2015
    Laos

    The Lao Land and Forest Allocation Policy (LFAP) was intended to provide clearer property rights for swidden farmers living in mountainous areas. These lands are legally defined as “State” forests but are under various forms of customary tenure. The policy involves demarcating village territorial boundaries, ecological zoning of lands within village territories, and finally allocating a limited number of individual land parcels to specific households for farming.

  9. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    December, 2018
    Laos

    FAO’s current cooperation with the Lao People’s Democratic Republic focuses on fostering agricultural<p></p>production and rural development, improving food security and nutrition, protecting and enhancing<p></p>forests and other ecosystems and improving the capacity to respond to food and agricultural threats<p></p>and emergencies.

  10. Library Resource
    Institutional & promotional materials
    October, 2018
    Laos, Kiribati, Chile, Guatemala, Djibouti, Thailand

    The World Soil Day Photo book 2017 presents WSD photographic stories in a visual narrative. This publication recognizes and prizes the efforts of all WSD event organizers worldwide. On 5 December more people than ever celebrated soil, carbon, and the opportunities right under our feet under the slogan “Caring for the Planet starts from the Ground”. Healthy soils are the living, breathing ecosystems that help grow our food, clean our water, store carbon, and reduce risks of droughts and floods.

Share this page