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Showing items 1 through 9 of 236.
  1. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    October, 2018
    Kenya, South Africa, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Africa

    In recent decades, many countries in sub-Saharan Africa have pursued national water permit systems, derived from the colonial era and reinforced by “global best practice.” These systems have proved logistically impossible to manage and have worsened inequality in water access. A new study conducted by the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) and Pegasys Institute, with support from the UK government, traces the origins of these systems, and describes their implementation and consequences for rural smallholders in five countries – Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    July, 2018
    Tanzania, Malawi, Africa, Eastern Africa, Southern Africa

    Widespread land degradation has serious negative ecological, social, and economic consequences. This is particularly true for smallholder farming systems in sub-Saharan Africa, which are crucial for the livelihoods of the majority of the population and the national economies. Sustainable land management (SLM) is seen as the best way to combat or even reverse land degradation. However, the contexts and conditions hindering land users’ uptake of SLM techniques are often poorly understood. The AGORA project explores the drivers of land degradation at two sites in Tanzania and Malawi.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2016
    Ethiopia

    Sustainable participatory watershed management is an approach promoted by the Ethiopian government to restore natural resources and agricultural productivity across the country. This comparative study between six watershed programs shows that this approach increases farmers’ food security and incomes (around 50% on average), as well as their resilience to drought and other climate shocks. However, the study also confirms that the nature and scale of impact can vary significantly between watershed programs.

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