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Showing items 1 through 9 of 40.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    January, 2006
    Ethiopia, Eastern Africa, Kenya, Uganda

    This chapter focuses on the management of agricultural land by smallholder households in the highlands of Kenya. It draws mainly from several recent studies from the central highland areas near to the south and west of Mt. Kenya and the western highland areas to the north and west of Kisumu, which were led by the authors. The chapter also draws from a set of studies under the KAMPAP project.1 See the appendix for a description of the key papers used in this synthesis.

  2. Library Resource
    January, 2005
    Ethiopia, Ghana, Mozambique

    This report summarise the research findings of a project to examine the current processes of land rights registration in Ethiopia, Ghana, and Mozambique and assess their outcomes for poor and vulnerable groups. It examines the design and process of registration, the governance of those processes and the equity of the outcomes.This research finds that land registration is not inherently anti-poor in its impacts and that the distributional consequences of land registration depend on the design of the process and on the institutions responsible for its management.

  3. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    January, 2006
    Ethiopia, Eastern Africa, Kenya, Uganda

    Common property resources1 are important sources of timber, fuelwood, and grazing land in developing countries. When community members have unrestricted access to the resource, or when use regulations are ineffective, these resources are exploited on a first-come, first-served basis. Each individual user of the resource will tend to continue to use the resource until her average revenue is equal to the marginal cost of using the resource (Gordon 1954).

  4. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    January, 2006
    Ethiopia, Eastern Africa, Kenya, Uganda

    In this chapter we introduce the conceptual framework that underlies the case studies presented in this book and discuss hypotheses about the effects of key factors on community and household decisions concerning income strategies and land management. We also discuss the influence of such decisions on outcomes such as agricultural production, household income, and land degradation (or improvement). This chapter is adapted from Scherr et al. (1996); Pender, Place, and Ehui (1999); Pender, Scherr, and Durón (2001); and Nkonya et al. (2004).

  5. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    January, 2006
    Ethiopia, Eastern Africa, Kenya, Uganda

    The highlands of East Africa have been endowed with a combination of moderate temperatures, adequate rainfall (falling in two distinct seasons for much of the highlands), and productive soils that make the region one of the best suited for agricultural development in all of Africa. As a consequence, the area has a long history of human habitation and supports some of the highest rural population densities in Africa (Hoekstra and Corbett 1995; Pender, Place, and Ehui 1999).

  6. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    January, 2006
    Ethiopia, Eastern Africa

    Recent trends in agricultural growth and food security in Eastern and Central Africa (ECA) have been discouraging. With very low labor productivity, yields, and growth rates, agriculture is unable to keep up with population growth or achieve the type of pro-poor growth needed to reduce poverty dramatically.Yet agriculture accounts for about half of the region’s gross domestic product (GDP) and is the main source of livelihood for the majority of the population. Behind this gloomy picture, however, lies agriculture’s potential to be the engine for growth in ECA.

  7. Library Resource
    Legislation
    January, 2005
    Ethiopia

    This Proclamation grants the power to specified local public bodies to expropriate rural or urban landholdings for public purpose where it believes that it should be used for a better development project to be carried out by public entities, private investors, cooperative societies or other organs, or where such expropriation has been decided by the appropriate higher regional or federal government organ for the same purpose. The Proclamation sets out the procedure of expropriation and provides with respect to compensation (which shall be paid in advance) and appeals.

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