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Showing items 1 through 9 of 5240.
  1. Library Resource

    Volume 7 Issue 2

    Peer-reviewed publication
    June, 2018
    Kenya

    Pastoral mobility is seen as the most effective strategy to make use of constantly shifting resources. However, mobile pastoralism as a highly-valued strategy to manage grazing areas and exploit resource variability is becoming more complex, due to recurrent droughts, loss of forage, government-led settlement schemes, and enclosure of land for community conservation, among other reasons. Yet knowledge of how Samburu pastoralists perceive these changes, and govern and innovate in their mobility patterns and resource use, has received limited attention.

  2. Library Resource

    Volume 7 Issue 2

    Peer-reviewed publication
    June, 2018
    Tanzania

    We studied livelihood changes and poverty dynamics over a 25-year period in two villages in central Tanzania. The villages were, from the early 1990s and 2000s, strikingly poor with between 50% and 55% of families in the poorest wealth groups. 25 years later much has changed: people have become substantially wealthier, with 64% and 71% in the middle wealth groups. The new wealth had been generated locally, from farming, particularly of sunflowers as a cash crop. This goes against a conventional view of small-scale farming in Tanzania as being stagnant or unproductive.

  3. Library Resource

    Volume 7 Issue 2

    Peer-reviewed publication
    June, 2018
    Kenya, Eastern Africa

    Rangelands throughout sub-Saharan Africa are currently undergoing two major pressures: climate change (through altered rainfall and seasonality patterns) and habitat fragmentation (brought by land use change driven by land demand for agriculture and conservation). Here we explore these dimensions, investigating the impact of land use change decisions, by pastoralists in southern Kenya rangelands, on human well-being and animal densities using an agent-based model.

  4. Library Resource

    Volume 7 Issue 2

    Peer-reviewed publication
    June, 2018
    South Africa, Zimbabwe, Southern Africa

    This paper investigates the drivers and dynamics of livelihood and landscape change over a 30-year period in two sites in the communal drylands of Zimbabwe (Marwendo) and South Africa (Tshivuhulani). Of particular interest to us was how access to social protection and a wider range of options may mitigate increased vulnerability under a changing climate. A mixed methods approach (using household surveys, focus group discussions, life history interviews, transect walks and secondary sources of data) was applied to develop human–environment timelines for each study site.

  5. Library Resource

    Volume 7 Issue 2

    Peer-reviewed publication
    June, 2018
    Ethiopia

    This article asks how Nyangatom pastoralists currently make sense of the past, present and future of their pastoralist livelihood. Nyangatom pastoralists, like all agro-pastoralist groups in southern Ethiopia, are faced with enormous structural changes in their immediate surroundings, primarily due to large-scale industrial agriculture and a government policy encouraging them to be sedentary. While the impacts have been discussed elsewhere, thus far little focus has been placed on what images of the past, present and future these changes create among the Nyangatom.

  6. Library Resource

    Volume 7 Issue 2

    Peer-reviewed publication
    June, 2018
    Kenya

    This paper addresses pastoral resilience by drawing out the coping strategies and mechanisms utilized by the Maasai Pastoralists through a food system approach, based on the study findings of an anthropological study of pastoralism as a food system in Laikipia County, Rift Valley, Kenya. The co-existence and interactions of pastoralism as a food system with other types of food systems in Laikipia, such as large-scale horticulture, justified the selection of the study site.

  7. Library Resource

    Volume 6 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2017
    Madagascar

    The global challenges of food security and biodiversity are rarely addressed together, though recently there has been an increasing awareness that the two issues are closely related. The majority of land available for agriculture is already used for food production, but despite the productivity gains, one in nine people worldwide are classified as food insecure. There is an increasing risk that addressing food insecurity through methods such as agricultural expansion or intensification could lead to biodiversity loss through destruction of habitats important for conservation.

  8. Library Resource

    Volume 6 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2017
    Ethiopia

    This study develops a methodology to identify hot spots of critical forage supply in nomadic pastoralist areas, using the Afar Region, Ethiopia, as a special case. It addresses two main problems. First, it makes a spatially explicit assessment of fodder supply and demand extracted from a data poor environment. Fodder supply is assessed by combining rainfall-based production functions and rule-based assessment for prevailing land use. Fodder demand is based on a data consistency check of livestock statistics concerning herd size, composition and geographical distribution.

  9. Library Resource

    Volume 6 Issue 4

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December, 2017
    Eastern Africa

    Restoration of degraded landscapes through the implementation of soil and water conservation practices is considered a viable option to increase agricultural production by enhancing ecosystems. However, in the humid Ethiopian highlands, little information is available on the impact of conservation practices despite wide scale implementation. The objective of this research was to document the effect of conservation practices on discharge and sediment concentration and load in watersheds that have different soil depths and topography.

  10. Library Resource
    Legislation & Policies
    May, 2019
    Tanzania

    Sustainable Toursim Development Plan for the portion of the unique Lake Eyasi Valley landscape in northern Tanzania falling into Karatu District. The most significant attractions for the destination is the last remaining hunter and gatherer societies (Hadzabe) with their unique life style, together with the life style of Datoga pastoralists.

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