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Showing items 1 through 9 of 44.
  1. Library Resource
    Cover photo
    Conference Papers & Reports
    March, 2017
    Tanzania

    Administration of land in Tanzania is more decentralized from the president to the village level. The law gives power to village councils and village assemblies to administer village land. The District authorities are given advisory and supervisory mandates over villages and represent the commissioner who takes overall administrative powers.  Despite decentralization, institutions responsible for land administration, land have continued to be cause of many conflicts for years.  Conflicts have been escalating and lead loss of lives and property.

  2. Library Resource
    Ghanaian cocoa farmer establishing specially-approved farm boundary pillars under the guidance of a Landmapp field agent (the pillar will be mounted with cement after mapping). Courtesy: Landmapp (www.landmapp.net)

    A CRIG/WCF Collaborative Survey, February 2017

    Reports & Research
    April, 2017
    Ghana

    The Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG), with support from the World Cocoa Foundation (WCF) the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), performed the Ghana Land Tenure Baseline Survey, the first of its kind survey of tenure rights among cocoa farmers in Ghana. CRIG surveyed almost 1,800 cocoa farmers operating 3,900 cocoa plots regarding various land tenure issues within customary sharecropping arrangements and on owner-managed land. This report describes the findings from the Survey.

  3. Library Resource
    Videos
    March, 2017
    Ethiopia

    Dead Donkeys Fear No Hyenas - a documentary thriller about land grabbing and the global rush for farmland - the new green gold! 


  4. Library Resource
    Tenure and Investment in Africa cover image
    Reports & Research
    February, 2017
    Africa, Kenya, Cameroon, Burkina Faso, Liberia, Mali, Senegal

    This synthesis of our findings from an investigation of tenure risk in East, West, and Southern Africa, shows that a majority of tenure disputes are caused by the displacement of local peoples, indicating that companies and investors are not doing enough to understand competing claims to the land they acquire or lease. This failure in diligence is particularly noteworthy given that a majority of the disputes analyzed had materially significant impacts: indeed, a higher proportion of projects in Africa are financially impacted by tenure dispute than any other region in the world. 

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