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Showing items 1 through 9 of 149.
  1. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2013
    Turkey

    Turkey is expected to experience significant climate change, including increased temperatures and desertification. As these changes affect forestry, agriculture and animal husbandry, they threaten the livelihoods of forest communities across the country. In addition, other, institutional factors such as the property regime can act in tandem with physical stressors to increase communities’ overall vulnerability to climate change.

  2. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2011
    Australia, New Zealand

    This article investigates how cultural landscapes (especially the potentially limiting organically evolved landscape) can be used as a research framework to evaluate historical mining heritage sites in Australia and New Zealand. We argue that when mining heritage sites are read as evolved organic landscapes and linked to the surrounding forested and hedged farmland, the disruptive aspects of mining are masked. Cultural landscape is now a separate listing for World Heritage sites and includes associative and designed landscape as well as those that have evolved organically.

  3. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2011
    Europe

    In the last two decades, planners and landscape architects have been concerned with the open space planning concept called ‘greenway planning’. This approach aims at nature protection that balances both conservation and growth, creating livable environments and maintaining open spaces. In Istanbul, the functional and spatial connectivity of greenways can protect the local landscape against urbanization and population growth problems. This study aimed to emphasize the natural and cultural heritage in an ecologically based planning approach.

  4. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012
    Australia

    Segmentation of landholders has rarely been undertaken in the natural resource management literature, yet it provides a rich set of information for planners to improve targeting of public investment and resources. Segmentation allows the identification of segments of landholders that are ‘investment ready’, their location and characteristics, and the land conservation incentive programmes that they would be most willing to participate in. Segments that are not investment ready are also identified, and the instances where they reside in critical ecological habitats.

  5. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2016
    Brazil

    In Brazil, the implementation of protected areas has often caused impoverishment and injustice to forest-dwelling peoples. With the launching of the re-democratic 1988 Constitution, numerous claims for access to resources, recognition of ethnic identities, and participation in environmental decision-making have been made by traditional peoples.

  6. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012

    The links between built form and environmental health are, as yet, inadequately understood. Risk is a formless and ambiguous phenomenon tightly embedded in the myriad pattern of land uses that generate it. Our research, which is founded on a contextualist notion of policy design, demonstrates the potential of innovative land use policy instruments (i.e. form-based codes, conditional use permits) to address risk. We model environmental risks from point and mobile sources in Southeast Los Angeles (SELA), a known air toxics hotspot.

  7. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2014

    Wildlife organizations often engage landowners in habitat management. Landowner typology research can provide suggestions for how to work with diverse types of landowners. We explored how typologies can inform selection of tools to engage landowners in early successional habitat (ESH) management. Using a survey, effectiveness of three kinds of tools were assessed: (a) basic needs, (b) learning, and (c) social. Across all types and typologies, learning tools were most likely to influence landowner behavior, whereas social tools (e.g., recognition) were least likely.

  8. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012

    Recent decades have seen a proliferation of conservation programmes designed to encourage private landholders to protect and enhance biodiversity on their land. This paper reviews research emphasising the role of social context in shaping private land conservation (PLC) outcomes. We examine the potential for a collaborative policy-making process incorporating design and implementation of PLC programmes to reduce conflict between conservation agencies and landholders and increase community consensus around PLC issues.

  9. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012

    One consequence of the transition of rural communities from industrialised agriculture and natural resource extraction to sustainable development principles has been the rise of community-based natural resource management (CBNRM). CBNRM entails collaborative efforts, typically involving local, state and federal agencies, private firms and landowners, non-governmental organisations such as environmental and economic development groups, and watershed councils. There are no agreed-upon metrics or even broadly accepted approaches for assessing the effectiveness of these new institutions.

  10. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2012
    Canada

    This paper evaluates an innovative two-tiered model of collaborative planning designed to increase participation of First Nations in resource and environmental planning in British Columbia, Canada. Like a one-tiered model, the two-tiered model engages stakeholders in face-to-face negotiations to develop a consensus plan. However, to finalize an agreement, recommendations from the first tier are then sent to a second tier of negotiations that includes only two parties – First Nations and the provincial government.

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