International Livestock Research Institute | Land Portal

Vision, mission and strategy

ILRI's strategy 2013-2022 was approved in December 2012. It emerged from a wide processof consultation and engagement.

ILRI envisions... a world where all people have access to enough food and livelihood options to fulfil their potential.

ILRI’s mission is... to improve food and nutritional security and to reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock—ensuring better lives through livestock.

ILRI’s three strategic objectives are:

  1. with partners, to develop, test, adapt and promote science-based practices that—being sustainable and scalable—achieve better lives through livestock.
  2. with partners,to provide compelling scientific evidence in ways that persuade decision-makers—from farms to boardrooms and parliaments—that smarter policies and bigger livestock investments can deliver significant socio-economic, health and environmental dividends to both poor nations and households.
  3. with partners,to increase capacity among ILRI’s key stakeholders to make better use of livestock science and investments for better lives through livestock.

This is ILRI’s second ten-year strategy. It incorporates a number of changes, many based on learning from the previous strategy (2000–2010, initially produced in 2000 and modified in 2002), an interim strategy (2011–2012) and an assessment of the external and internal environments in which the institute operates.

International Livestock Research Institute Resources

Displaying 1 - 10 of 1149
Journal Articles & Books
August 2019
Africa
Eastern Africa
Kenya

Livestock-wildlife interactions promote the transmission of a wide range of infectious diseases that constraint livestock production. We used a participatory appraisal approach to find out and rank infectious diseases of concern to pastoralists in a zone of intense wildlife-livestock interaction and another zone with limited interactions.

Journal Articles & Books
March 2019
Vietnam
Asia
South-Eastern Asia

The study provides a framework to estimate the health risk of farmers using wastewater in agriculture.
The study addresses the SDG 6.3: to contribute to inform water recycling and reuse.
Exposure to wastewater via contact with Nhue River water, pond water and composted excreta represents an important health risk.

Journal Articles & Books
February 2019

In the last 40 years, large areas of the Mau forest, the largest contiguous tropical montane forest in East Africa, have been cleared for agriculture. To date, there are no empirical data on how this land use change affects carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes from soil respiration and soil methane (CH4) fluxes.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2018
Uganda
Africa
Eastern Africa

This study aims to explain effects of soil textural class, topography, land use, and land use history on soil greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in the Lake Victoria region. We measured GHG fluxes from intact soil cores collected in Rakai, Uganda, an area characterized by low‐input smallholder (<2 ha) farming systems, typical for the East African highlands.

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