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Center for Open Science
Acronym: 
COS

Location

Center for Open Science
210 Ridge McIntire Road Suite 500
2903-5083 Charlottesville , Virginia
United States
Virginia US
Working languages: 
English

Our mission is to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of research.

These are core values of scholarship and practicing them is presumed to increase the efficiency of acquiring knowledge.

For COS to achieve our mission, we must drive change in the culture and incentives that drive researchers’ behavior, the infrastructure that supports their research, and the business models that dominate scholarly communication.

This culture change requires simultaneous movement by funders, institutions, researchers, and service providers across national and disciplinary boundaries. Despite this, the vision is achievable because openness, integrity, and reproducibility are shared values, the technological capacity is available, and alternative sustainable business models exist.

COS's philosophy and motivation is summarized in its strategic plan and in scholarly articles outlining a vision of scientific utopia for research communication and research practices.

Because of our generous funders and outstanding partners, we are able to produce entirely free and open-source products and services. Use the header above to explore the team, services, and communities that make COS possible and productive.

Center for Open Science Resources

Displaying 51 - 60 of 448
Library Resource
Reports & Research
January, 2018
Global

Agroforestry as a model of community-based forest management generally does not develop and is mostly in the form of traditional management. In West Sumatra, sustainability relates to the status of land tenure as communal property (communal land). Communal interests that appear on the communal rights to land and trees are able to direct the management of agroforestry to be sustained. Lack of security of land tenure does not affect the appearance of agroforestry, but the level of management or management of land use is more important for the purpose.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
January, 2018
Australia, Brazil, Canada, United States of America

Declines in global biodiversity due to land conversion and habitat loss are driving a "Sixth Mass Extinction" and many countries currently fall short of meeting even nominal land protection targets to mitigate this crisis. Here, we quantify the potential contribution of Indigenous lands to biodiversity conservation using case studies of Australia, Brazil and Canada. Indigenous lands in each country are slightly more species rich than existing protected areas and, in Brazil and Canada, support more threatened species than existing protected areas or random sites.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2017
French Southern and Antarctic Lands, France

Users of transport infrastructures nearby hazardous plants may represent important populations potentially impacted by a major accident. Toulouse catastrophe in 2011 has been an illustrative example as it strongly impacted highway users. Therefore, transport infrastructure users (Roads and railways mainly) represent a population to be protected within a land use planning policy as it is the case for inhabitants.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
November, 2017
United States of America

Funding from the voluntary carbon market (VCM) can help to restore productive landscapes, if it is embedded in the local context of traditions and in state governance systems. Restoration efforts under a performance-based VCM programme, if planned well, can also improve livelihoods.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
October, 2017
United States of America

Understanding the combined and separate effects of climate and land use change on the water cycle is necessary to mitigate negative impacts. However, existing methodologies typically divide data into discrete (before and after) periods, implicitly representing climate and land use as step changes when in reality these changes are often gradual. Here, we introduce a new regression-based methodological framework designed to separate climate and land use effects on any hydrological flux of interest continuously through time, and estimate uncertainty in the contribution of these two drivers.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
October, 2017
Ethiopia

This paper investigates the impact of a rural land certification program on schooling in two zones of the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Using the variation in the timing of the arrival of the program at the local level, we investigate the link between land tenure security, schooling and child labor. The results show a positive effect of improved land rights on school enrollment for all children in one of the zones studied, and for oldest sons in the other. Grade progress of oldest sons, who are most likely to inherit the land, worsens.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
October, 2017
Indonesia

The need for bananas in Bali far exceeds the production. To obtain optimal production according to their genetic potential, the development of banana cultivation should be preceded by a land suitability evaluation study.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
October, 2017
Benin

The formalisation of local or customary land rights is often seen as a means of tackling insecurity of land tenure and encouraging investment. Several tools, such as the Rural Land Plans (PFRs) used in Benin, seem to resolve the tension between the logic of registering rights in order to increase productivity and the logic of securing complex local rights and reducing conflict. But while PFRs are potentially a good tool for dealing with complexity, current policy debate in Benin tends to focus on them as a tool for privatisation.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
September, 2017
Brazil, United States of America

Remote sensing satellite data offer the unique possibility to map land use land cover transformations by providing spatially explicit information. However, detection of short-term processes and land use patterns of high spatial-temporal variability is a challenging task. We present a novel framework using multi-temporal TerraSAR-X data and machine learning techniques, namely Discriminative Markov Random Fields with spatio-temporal priors, and Import Vector Machines, in order to advance the mapping of land cover characterized by short-term changes.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
August, 2017
Global

Globally, privately protected areas (PPAs) are an increasingly popular approach to long-term protection of biodiversity on privately owned lands. PPAs provide multiple ecological, social and economic benefits to diverse range of stakeholders in across a range of contexts. These include supporting the desire of landowners to protect conservation values on their land, contributing to national conservation targets, and reducing financial costs of land management to governments.

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