Two decades of farmer managed natural regeneration on the Seno plain, Mali. Included in Restoring African Drylands | Land Portal

Información del recurso

Date of publication: 
Diciembre 2020
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
UNCCD:600000107

The adoption of FMNR increased by 50% over 20 years; about 90% of all farmers now encourage natural regeneration on the land that they manage. The key to success is having local institutions that are respected and effective. The experience in Bankass shows that reforestation rates of at least 250 trees per hectare can be achieved by farmer managed natural regeneration on Sahelian agricultural lands, recreating an agroforestry parkland at a fraction of the cost of establishing conventional plantations.

Lessons learned about FMNR and key factors for its success include the critical importance of effective local institutions and of their good working relationships with communes, community-based associations, government extension services, and NGOs.

The Barahogon traditional association was formally registered 20 years ago and has been promoting FMNR ever since. The strength of these traditional institutions is remarkable, given the constantly changing context, including the adoption of new legislation and regulations, the near-doubling of the sedentary population in the area, added pressure on access to land and natural resources, and increased security concerns.

The current situation in Mali has exacerbated intercommunity tensions, in particular between the Dogon (traditionally farmers) and Peulh (traditionally pastoralists) (Toulmin et al. 2020). Also, because one of the country’s jihadi leaders is Peulh, many people assume that all Peulh are jihadists, and there are accusations of extrajudicial killings by the military and of attacks by local militia from both sides.

Due to this deteriorating security, the management of natural resources is a lesser priority for local communities, whose lives and livelihoods face more immediate threats. Many people — both Dogon and Peulh — have fled the district, and some may never return. If local institutions are to continue to contribute to the management of natural resources, they will require backing from national and local authorities. This must be well financed over the long term, and supported by capacity building and training for their leaders.

Autores y editores

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

Allen, Mary
Diakhite, Mamadou
Gana, Drissa

Corporate Author(s): 

The European Tropical Forest Research Network (ETFRN) is a network on forests and development, which aims to ensure that European research contributes to conservation and sustainable use of forest and tree resources in tropical and subtropical countries.

ETFRN was established in 1991 in response to the growing concernes on the rapid deforestation occurring particularly in the tropics, and the European Commission's desire to mobilise European research to address this challenge.

Publisher(s): 

The European Tropical Forest Research Network (ETFRN) is a network on forests and development, which aims to ensure that European research contributes to conservation and sustainable use of forest and tree resources in tropical and subtropical countries.

ETFRN was established in 1991 in response to the growing concernes on the rapid deforestation occurring particularly in the tropics, and the European Commission's desire to mobilise European research to address this challenge.

Proveedor de datos

The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa (UNCCD) is a Convention to combat desertification and mitigate the effects of drought through national action programs that incorporate long-term strategies supported by international cooperation and partnership arrangements.

 

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