Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
LANDac International Conference 2022
23 June 2022
Authors: 
Mr. Neil Sorensen
Netherlands
Global

The 13th Annual LANDac Annual Conference is taking place in person next week in Utrecht, Netherlands, for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic began. All the conference sessions will also be accessible online to registered participants. LANDac brings together land governance stakeholders from around the world who might not otherwise meet, including academic researchers, the private, civil society, and policy makers.

LDNphoto.png
17 June 2022
Global

June 17th 2022-  Today marks #DesertificationAndDroughtDay and to highlight the occasion, the Land Portal, FAO and the UNCCD have come together to launch two new products; a portfolio and podcast, delving into the important relationship between land tenure and Land Degradation Neutrality.  

Empowering civil society and communities through open land data
14 June 2022
Authors: 
Lilian Lee
Africa
Cameroon
Namibia
South America
Colombia
Paraguay
Global

Webinar participants responded to the question, "Provide one or two words that
come to mind when you think of open data."
Transparency and empowerment were the top words

      
700+
indicators

Statistical data aggregated from trusted providers 
    

        
     66,000+ resources

Searchable library of open access publications   
    

Solutions Journalism Network
Land-at-Scale

LandVoc logo

A controlled vocabulary
and powerful tool
for making data and information
more discoverable.

GeoPortal logo

An easy-to-use tool
for bringing together and visualizing 
statistical and geospatial data 
related to land issues.

Open Up Guide for Land Governance

Open Up
guide for 
Land Governance
    

Countries

 Mopani coppermine Photo by PhotoSmith2011 (CC-BY-SA 2.0)

Zambia is a former British Colony which obtained independence in 1964. Heavily dependent on revenues from copper and cobalt mining, the economy has been vulnerable to the rise and fall of commodity prices throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.

Issues

Photo by UNICEF Ethiopia. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

One third of the world’s soils - including farmland, forests, rangelands, and urban land - are already degraded and it is estimated that this number could rise to almost 90% by 2050. Land Degradation occurs naturally, but research shows that land degradation is increasingly caused directly or indirectly by unsustainable human activities, notably deforestation, overgrazing, mining or intensive agriculture. This has driven biodiversity loss, desertification, and led to a significant increase in greenhouse gas emissions.

Land and SDGs

The SDG Land Tracker provides easy access to official data and information on all land-specific SDG indicators. It concisely explains the indicators, why they are important, and tracks progress.

Join the Debate

Events

Data

Library

Share this page