Democracy and deforestation. The politics of protecting the forests | Land Portal

Resource information

Date of publication: 
January 2002
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
eldis:A8750

How can the process of tropical deforestation be controlled? We now know a good deal about the causes of deforestation but not its control. Research from the University of Leeds in Thailand and the Philippines fills this gap, showing that changes in the domestic political scene explain how deforestation processes have been controlled in the two countries. Environmental constraints and increases in agricultural productivity can curb the demand for farmland to some extent. Controlling deforestation will depend ultimately, however, on domestic political pressures demanding a change in policy and on the capacity of implementing institutions to carry them through to fruition.

Authors and Publishers

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

Alan Grainger

Publisher(s): 

Aims to make policymakers and on-the-ground development managers aware of the latest and best in British development research findings. Offers policy-relevant findings on critical global development issues, drawn from over 40 major UK-based economics and social studies departments and think-tanks, together with a wide range of NGO research departments and consultants.

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Eldis is an online information service providing free access to relevant, up-to-date and diverse research on international development issues. The database includes over 40,000 summaries and provides free links to full-text research and policy documents from over 8,000 publishers. Each document is selected by members of our editorial team.

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