THE KARNATAKA LAND REFORMS ACT, 1961. | Land Portal

Resource information

Date of publication: 
March 1962
Resource Language: 
Pages: 
123

Report presents the Act of 1961 and its ammendemnets in the sucessive years. 

The Bill has been prepared with a view to introducing a common law relating to tenancy and other allied matters throughout the new State of Mysore in replacement of the following Acts which are in force in the several areas:—

1. The Bombay Tenancy and Agricultural Lands Act, 1948, as in force in the Bombay Area;

2. The Hyderabad Tenancy and Agricultural Lands Act, 1950, as in force in the Hyderabad Area;

3. The Mysore Tenancy Act, 1952, as in force in the Mysore Area, including Bellary District;

4. (a) The Madras Cultivating Tenants Protection Act, 1955; (b) The Madras Cultivating Tenants (Payment of Fair Rent Act), 1956 as in force in South Kanara and Kollegal Taluk;

5. The Coorg Tenants Act, 1957, as in force in the Coorg District.

The Bill is generally modelled on the recommendations of the Mysore Tenancy and Agricultural Land Laws Committee constituted in May 1957, with some changes in the light of the opinion expressed in the Legislature and the suggestions of the Central Committee on Land Reforms constituted by the Planning Commission. The main features of the Bill are— (1) In future, leases will be permitted only in respect of lands held by persons suffering from some disability or persons serving in the Armed Forces or persons whose holding does not exceed a basic holding;

(2) In respect of lands leased out at the commencement of the Act, the right of resumption is generally regulated such that a tenant is left with a part of the holding, except where the land leased out is itself less than a basic holding and cannot be sub-divided;

(3) The rate of rent will be one-fourth of the gross produce in the case of irrigated lands and one-fifth of the gross produce in the case of other lands subject to the condition that the existing rents are not liable to enhancement;

(4) The extent of land which a land-owner cannot resume for personal cultivation will vest in Government on a notified date and the tenants who are actually cultivating such lands will be given occupancy rights subject to payment of fifteen times the rent minus land revenue, which amount will be paid to the owner as compensation;

(5) For regulating the rights of resumption and other all matters, the family holding is defined as the holding giving a income of Rs. 1,200 per annum; and

(6) The ceiling limit to land holdings will be three fan holdings. Existing holdings under personal cultivation which are managed according to prescribed standards and existing plantation including coconut and areca plantations will be exempted from ceiling.

Authors and Publishers

Corporate Author(s): 

Karnataka is a state in southwest India with Arabian Sea coastlines. The capital, Bengaluru (formerly Bangalore), is a high-tech hub known for its shopping and nightlife. To the southwest, Mysore is home to lavish temples including Mysore Palace, former seat of the region’s maharajas. Hampi, once the medieval Vijayanagara empire’s capital, contains ruins of Hindu temples, elephant stables and a stone chariot.

Publisher(s): 

Karnataka is a state in southwest India with Arabian Sea coastlines. The capital, Bengaluru (formerly Bangalore), is a high-tech hub known for its shopping and nightlife. To the southwest, Mysore is home to lavish temples including Mysore Palace, former seat of the region’s maharajas. Hampi, once the medieval Vijayanagara empire’s capital, contains ruins of Hindu temples, elephant stables and a stone chariot.

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