Lands (Title Vesting, etc.) Act. | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

Resource information

Date of publication: 
January 1993
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
LEX-FAOC120419
Pages: 
2
License of the resource: 
Copyright details: 
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This Act declares all the lands within 100 metres limit of the 1967 shoreline of Nigeria and any other land reclaimed from any lagoon, sea or ocean in or bordering Nigeria or of oceans bordering the Federal Republic of Nigeria, to the exclusion of any right accruing to any body corporate or unincorporate or industry, to vest in the Federal Government of Nigeria. All such lands shall be controlled and managed for and on behalf of the Federal Government of Nigeria by the Federal Ministry charged with responsibility for lands and land matters or any other authority designated by that Ministry for the purposes of this Act. The Act also provides for the regularization by the Federal Government of leases granted by any State or local government, individual or any body corporate or unincorporate or any agency of the State or local government, in respect of any such land.

Authors and Publishers

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 
Rudolph Hupperts (CONSLEGB)
Publisher(s): 

British influence and control over what would become Nigeria and Africa's most populous country grew through the 19th century. A series of constitutions after World War II granted Nigeria greater autonomy. After independence in 1960, politics were marked by coups and mostly military rule, until the death of a military head of state in 1998 allowed for a political transition. In 1999, a new constitution was adopted and a peaceful transition to civilian government was completed.

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