Land Portal | Sécurisation des droits fonciers à travers les données ouvertes |

700+ indicateurs

Données statistiques agrégées par des par des fournisseurs officiels

60,700+ ressources

Bibliothèque de publications de données ouvertes

Soyez des nôtres

Inscrivez-vous pour contribuer du contenu et abonnez-vous au bulletin d'information!

Partner pages

Quantifying Tenure Risk (QTR)
Land: Enhancing Governance for Economic Development (LEGEND)

LandVoc logo

       Un lexique de termes contrôlés et un outil puissant visant à rendre les informations plus accessibles .        

GeoPortal logo

Un outil facile d’usage pour la collecte et la visualisation de données statistiques et géospatiales liées aux questions foncières.

Pays

Sierre Leone agriculture photo by WorldFish

Land is an essential source of livelihood for a majority of Sierra Leoneans. Most of Sierra Leone’s population lives in rural areas and it’s GDP is largely based on agriculture. The three main livelihood activities surveyed in the 2015 population and housing census are crop farming, animal husbandry and fishery, which depend largely on access to and ownership of land. Smallholders mostly cultivate rice, cassava, cocoa, coffee, cashew, groundnut, palm oil, vegetables and other fruit trees.

Learn more

Peru agriculture land

Peru shares the main land-related problems of several South American countries: the existence of very large landholdings (latifundios), on the one hand, and small landholdings (minifundios), on the other, in historical processes marked by the interests of actors such as landowners, agro-industrialists, peasants, and indigenous communities. However, unlike some neighboring countries, the dynamics of these elements are different due to a series of particular agricultural policies and their respective results, which have placed Peru as one of the main producers and exporters of agricultural crops in the region.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Peru.

Thèmes

With secure land tenure, Indigenous Peoples and local communities can realize human rights, achieve economic growth, protect the environment, and maintain cultural integrity. For centuries, Indigenous Peoples and local communities (IPLCs) have used, managed and depended on collectively-held land for food supplies, cultural and spiritual traditions, and other livelihood needs. Historically governed through customary tenure systems rooted in community norms and practices that often go back centuries, governments often consider such community land as vacant, idle, or state-owned property.  Statutory recognition and protection of indigenous and community land rights continues to be a major challenge.

Learn more about challenges concerning Indigenous & Community Land Rights.

Participer au Débats

Événements

Données

Bibliothèque

Partagez cette page